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2018-07-17T19:36:09.343Z
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{"feed":"npr-movies","feedTitle":"NPR Movies","feedLink":"/feed/npr-movies","catTitle":"Entertainment","catLink":"/cat/entertainment"}

The streaming service and production house fell short of its second-quarter target by more than a million subscribers, even as it posted better-than-expected earnings for the period.

(Image credit: Matt Rourke/AP)

Asura, billed as an epic fantasy based on Buddhist mythology that cost $112 million to make, had a dismal box office in its opening weekend and was promptly pulled by producers.

(Image credit: VCG/VCG via Getty Images)

As of July 16, there will be only one Blockbuster video store operating in the United States — in Bend, Ore.

NPR's Michel Martin speaks with MoviePass CEO Mitch Lowe about the future of the MoviePass subscription service, which is on the brink of bankruptcy.

NPR's Michel Martin speaks with director Gus Van Sant about his new film, Don't Worry He Won't Get Far On Foot, which chronicles the fall and rise of cartoonist John Callahan.

A new documentary, Robin Williams: Come Inside My Mind, airs Monday on HBO. It aims to bring the viewer into his mind to see how he saw the world and the challenges he struggled with.

NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro asks Rob Reiner and Joey Hartstone about their new film Shock and Awe, which tells the story of Knight-Ridder journalists who reported the run-up to the Iraq War.

NPR's Michel Martin speaks with comedian Bo Burnham about his new film, Eighth Grade.

For a contest after the ouster of Robert Mugabe, filmmakers responded to the question "What does it mean to be Zimbabwean?" Their short films featured some uncomfortable answers.

(Image credit: Claire Harbage/NPR)

"In light of recent ethical questions raised surrounding my casting as Dante Tex Gill, I have decided to respectfully withdraw my participation in the project," Johansson said in a statement Friday.

(Image credit: Jordan Strauss/Invision)

Hunter, who died Sunday, made more than 50 films, including Damn Yankees, Battle Cry and That Kind of Woman, before coming out as gay later in life. He spoke to Fresh Air in 2005.

Immigration, culture clashes and divided families are all part of the cultural conversation in What Will People Say. Filmmaker Iram Haq based this story on her own experience as a young woman in Norway.

When the parents of Nisha (Maria Mazhdah) discover a boyfriend in her bedroom, they send her from her home in Norway to live with relatives in Pakistan, in Iram Haq's harrowing second feature.

(Image credit: Kono Lorber )

Elsie Fisher stars as a teenage girl about to graduate from middle school in Bo Burnham's new film. Critic Justin Chang calls Eighth Grade an "enormously affecting" film that plays like a documentary.

(Image credit: A24)

"If 98 movie minutes about the subversion of campaign financing isn't quite your idea of beating the summer heat," says critic Ella Taylor, "there's not a dull or dry moment" in this incisive doc.

(Image credit: PBS)

YouTube star Bo Burnham is mostly known for the rapid-fire comic videos he started making as a teenager. Now 27, he has an impressively diverse resume that now includes movie director asEighth Grade, a film from about the moment when adolescence kicks in debuts.

Skyscraper is a summer confection where Dwayne Johnson plays a man who wants to get into a burning building to save his family from a bunch of bad guys and a fire. Happy dog days of summer.

(Image credit: Legendary Pictures)

The '50s heartthrob who lived a closeted life during the peak of popularity survived the end of the Hollywood studio system by refusing to make many of the compromises his fellow gay actors did.

(Image credit: Archive Photos/Getty Images)

Stanfield has had a number of oddball roles, most recently in the telemarketing satire Sorry to Bother You, where he plays a character who learns to get ahead by using a "white voice" on the phone.

(Image credit: Peter Prato/Annapurna Pictures)

Tim Wardle's new knockout documentary starts out as a Parent Trap-like lark about three young men who, by chance, realize that they are triplets, but ultimately takes a more devastating turn.