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2018-06-18T17:03:51.846Z
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Fox has a new plan to stop people from tuning out during commercial breaks.

Fox Network Group has a new plan to stop people from tuning out during commercial breaks. According to Variety, the company is planning a series of sponsored, dramatic shorts around the theme of overcoming adversity. The idea is that videos could generate revenue through sponsorships: A pharmaceutical company, for instance, might sponsor a video about fighting cancer, and an insurance company might sponsor a video about losing a limb. The videos could range from six seconds in length to longer-form expositions, and will appear on all Fox-owned channels.

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Seventeen investors have asked Amazon to stop selling its Rekognition technology to government entities.

Amazon is facing shareholder opposition over the sale of its facial recognition technology to law enforcement. In a letter sent this morning, 17 investors have asked Amazon to stop selling its Rekognition technology to government entities, citing privacy concerns.

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Despite the Cambridge Analytica fiasco, Facebook’s stock is doing well and about the cross the $200 line.

Remember just a few months ago when it looked like Facebook was facing an existential crisis that could even threaten its bottom line? Revelations about Cambridge Analytica’s ability to hoover up tens of millions of Facebook users’ personal data came to light, and the company was forced to reckon with the fact that its business model is predicated on people unknowingly giving up their personal data. The stock dropped significantly, and the executives were asked to testify before numerous government committees.

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When you’re desperate to leave your job, it can be tempting to take the first offer that comes along. Don’t.

When you want a job–whether it’s your dream job or you’re simply ready to move on–it can be all too easy to accept any offer you’re given–even if it’s not the right offer for you.

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SurveyMonkey broke the Silicon Valley mold this year by extending full benefits to workers that contract with the company through third-party agencies. Could the rest of the industry move away from scrimping on benefits to save costs?

Every day at SurveyMonkey’s campus in San Mateo, Derrick Lau leads his entire team in the cafeteria kitchen as they prepare meals for the over 400 employees that work out of the office. “Derrick is like the MVP of SurveyMonkey,” Becky Cantieri, VP of human services, tells Fast Company. He’s well-loved by staff and checks in with people on Slack–which is not exactly a typical relationship between Silicon Valley chefs and company staff.

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Fans waited 14 years for a sequel to the Disney Pixar classic

This weekend, Pixar’s The Incredibles 2 scored the highest opening weekend ever for an animated movie. The family of superheroes raked in $180 million at the domestic box office, surpassing the previous record holder, Pixar’s Finding Dory, which topped $135 million in 2016, and blowing Disney’s other highly anticipated release, Solo: A Star Wars Story, out of the water faster than Millennium Falcon did the Kessel Run. According to CNN, that wasn’t Incredibles 2‘s only achievement—it also snagged the second-biggest June opening of all time, falling just behind 2015’s Jurassic World, and is the eighth best debut of all time.

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On the heels of the AT&T/Time Warner decision, analysts are souring on Disney.

It was only a week ago that a federal judge ruled in favor of AT&T, making it possible for the telco to acquire Time Warner. Beyond having an impact on its own deal, this ruling is already causing industry-wide tectonic shifts. One such example is Disney, which bid on 21st Century Fox last year, only to be outbid last week by Comcast. Comcast, it seems, was emboldened by the AT&T ruling.

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The legendary synth maker’s new semi-modular analog device is designed to let virtually anyone explore synthesis—no patching required.

These first few decades of the 21st century have seen some of the most groundbreaking pieces of music technology, including a range of new analog modular synths. The legendary Moog Music itself has evolved, returning to modular synth design even as it moves into the future, with pieces of semi-modular kit like the Mother 32 and the DFAM drum machine. The company also recently manufactured 40 new units of its Moog Synthesizer IIIp, a gorgeous analog machine released in 1969 and used by the likes of pioneering synthesis master Wendy Carlos, experimental musician Isao Tomita, Giorgio Morodor, and even The Beatles. Given that it cost $7,985 back then, the new price is kind of a bargain: $35,000.

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First Lady continues to try to Be Best.

First Lady Melania Trump, an immigrant, “hates to see” other immigrants have their children ripped out of their arms and stored in former Walmarts.

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Figuring out how much you should ask for when starting a job or getting a raise takes a little bit of savvy work.

Every article on salary negotiations has the same piece of advice: Do your research before naming any figures.

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“Tracking my time has changed how I think about my time. Knowing exactly where my hours go has helped me feel like I can slow time’s ceaseless ticking.”

It seemed mundane at the beginning. On Monday, April 20, 2015, I opened a new spreadsheet on my laptop. I put the days of the week along the top. I put half hour blocks, from 5 a.m. to 4:30 a.m. along the left side. I began recording what I was doing on this time log: work, sleep, drive to train station, make kids breakfast.

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Predicting performance takes more (and better) data than recruiters think. Without it, these false positives lead to hiring choices all parties live to regret.

In looking for talent, employers and recruiters are trying to predict a candidate’s future job performance. That’s mostly a question of whether someone’s abilities, values, and personality are a good fit for a given role. But to determine that, you need the following:

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The websites of cigarette manufacturers will be required to post clearly labeled warnings about the negative health effects of smoking and the addictive nature of nicotine.

The websites of cigarette manufacturers will be required to post clearly labeled warnings about the negative health effects of smoking and the addictive nature of nicotine from today, reports CNBC. The warnings are officially known as “corrective statements” and are required to address five topics:

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And 62% of people want more regulation on social media networks.

And you can guess why: fears over their privacy. That comes to us from research conducted by public relations consultancy Edelman, reports CNBC. A full 4 out of every 10 people surveyed said they’d closed at least one of their social media accounts in the past year. As Edelman CEO Richard Edelman told CNBC:

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The feature will be powered by the RapidSOS system.

Apple announced today that all iPhones running iOS 12 will automatically share the user’s location data with emergency services when that user calls 911, CNBC reports. The feature will be powered by the RapidSOS system. The system enables 911 call centers to access a phone’s Hybridized Emergency Location data, which includes the phone’s proximity to known Wi-Fi hotspots and cellular towers. Announcing the feature on Monday, Tim Cook said:

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One hotel in Ireland got so sick of wannabe influencers that they banned all YouTubers and Instagram stars from staying at their hotels. It now looks like other hotels may be tempted to follow suit.

It’s no secret that hotels and other luxury brands will often give Instagram users with massive followings free swag or stays in exchange for promoting their product to their millions of followers. However, there’s a growing number of Instagram wannabe “influencers” that are inundating hotels around the world with requests–and it’s driving hotels crazy, reports the Atlantic. The publication relates what one marketing and communications manager at a five-star hotel in the Maldives told them:

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Critics of such conspiracy videos argue that by appearing on paid-for services such as Netflix and Prime Video the services are lending the videos a sense of accuracy and authenticity as they are available side-by-side with respected, fact-driven documentaries.

The Telegraph has an interesting report that highlights a growing problem for video streaming providers: the increasing amount of conspiracy videos peddling often-debunked narratives on services like Netflix and Amazon Prime Video. The report specifically focuses on Prime Video and notes how paying subscribers get access to conspiracy videos by the likes of Alex Jones and David Icke. Jones is notorious for saying the Sandy Hook elementary school shooting was a false flag operation to help impose gun control in the U.S.–and the half-dozen videos Amazon Prime hosts of his include ideas like the Obama administration was backed by the New World Order to “attempt to con the American people into accepting global slavery.”

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The deal will allow Google to draw people away from Amazon when doing product searches online.

The U.S. search giant is investing $550 million in cash into China’s second-largest e-commerce player, JD.com, reports CNBC. JD.com is locked in a heated battle for customers with China’s largest e-retailer, Alibaba. The company has recently teamed up with Walmart to sell groceries. Its new deal with Google will see JD.com gain a partner that can better help it to develop its retail infrastructure as well as make a selection of its products available to Western shoppers via Google Shopping.

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How the coworking company is working to get displaced people back on their feet–and into new opportunities.

If you work at WeWork’s Times Square coworking office, you might see Mamadou Diallo stocking a coffee station or cleaning a conference room. He’s been on the job for a little over eight months. Two years ago, he was forced to flee his home country of Guinea as a political refugee, after his active membership in an opposition party. “I had to leave the country not to be killed by security forces,” he says. Diallo is one of dozens of refugees that WeWork hired last year; over the next few years, it will hire hundreds more.

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Lifelong lessons no kid should ever have to learn.

“Teddy, what’s three times five?” It’s asked in a voice I can’t ignore.

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