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2018-01-23T17:36:46.312Z
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Every week users submit a lot of interesting stuff on our sister site Webdesigner News, highlighting great content from around the web that can be of interest to web designers. 

The best way to keep track of all the great stories and news being posted is simply to check out the Webdesigner News site, however, in case you missed some here’s a quick and useful compilation of the most popular designer news that we curated from the past week.

Note that this is only a very small selection of the links that were posted, so don’t miss out and subscribe to our newsletter and follow the site daily for all the news.

Bye Bye Material Design

 

Safari is the New Internet Explorer

 

Gridbox – A Website/interface Builder for Bootstrap and Foundation

 

How the BBC Builds Websites that Scale

 

Productive – The Only Tool You Need to Run a Profitable Agency

 

10 New Principles of Good Design

 

Adele – The Most Complete Design Systems Repository

 

Instagram.css – Complete Set of Instagram Filters in Pure CSS

 

Renaissance – The Freshest CSS Framework

Every week we feature a set of comics created exclusively for WDD.

The content revolves around web design, blogging and funny situations that we encounter in our daily lives as designers.

These great cartoons are created by Jerry King, an award-winning cartoonist who’s one of the most published, prolific and versatile cartoonists in the world today.

So for a few moments, take a break from your daily routine, have a laugh and enjoy these funny cartoons.

Feel free to leave your comments and suggestions below as well as any related stories of your own…

Just keep designing

Stress site

 

Rude emoji

Can you relate to these situations? Please share your funny stories and comments below…

100 Universal Geometric Shapes – only $9!

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Today we’d like to demonstrate how to build an interactive HTML5 banner ad.

This was a project we did for Carlsberg a while back, which we think can be useful for designers and programmers interested in front-end design work.

Carlsberg is a multi-billion dollar, global beer brand that employs over 40,000 people around the world. Besides the household Carlsberg brand, they also house other brands such as Tuborg, Somersby (cider), Kronenbourg, and Dali Beer (a fast growing brand in Asia).

What Is An Interactive Ad?

Let’s do a quick recap. In the old days, we had text ads, which are basically a short text blurb with a link to the advertiser’s page, product or service.

Next came static banner ads. These are typically static images. They’re more compelling that text ads, because images are worth a thousand words. The main formats come in a 300×250 pixels (box), 728×90 (wide) or 90×728 (skyscraper).

Then, Flash technology game along on the desktop browser. Flash was revolutionary, because it enabled a wave of animated banner ads, as well as interactive ones. Animated ads captivate user attention resulting in higher click through rates (CTR). Players could even play a micro-game such shooting something, or throwing a ball into the hoop.

In 2010, Apple convinced the world of the virtues of switching to HTML5, and with giants including Google following suit, Flash technology quickly declined.

Ad technology companies see the huge growth potential in mobile, and hence started implementing HTML5 into a new,...

In 2016, 34% of the US workforce worked as freelancers, and by 2020, it’s estimated that number will rise to 43%. Freelance opportunities aren’t going anywhere, and more professionals are swapping in their office key cards for a home office.

While the idea of sitting around in sweatpants or relaxing on a beach while working sounds like perfection, freelancing isn’t always a walk in the park. From juggling business responsibilities and invoices to finding your next gig, freelancing comes with its issues. Despite these challenges, a few tips can help you find success and happiness in your career.

1. Believe in Your Worth

Particularly when you’re new to freelancing, it can be intimidating to set your fee. While some projects or jobs may entail negotiation, it’s best to set your rates and stick to them. Depending on your niche, you may work on an hourly rate or quote per project. Set a rate that’s on trend with your industry rather than settle. While you may find more gigs when charging less than the industry average, you’ll experience more stress trying to juggle enough projects to meet your income goals.

2. Network Even When You’re Not Seeking Work

Networking is the lifeblood of freelancing; it’s necessary to keep your business alive. Even when you have contracts, freelancing jobs can be unpredictable. You may have ten small projects one month...

Gather ’round, ladies, gents, and children. Lo, before your very eyes, we shall reveal several freaks of the Internet! Behold! Websites that don’t need JavaScript to display their god-given content!

Oh, you think I’m kidding? Websites that are presented by plain old HTML and CSS are becoming increasingly rare. At this juncture, I don’t know who to blame, and is it really worth blaming anybody? I could point finger at whomever or whatever I think is to blame, or I could point fingers at creative and sometimes large websites that do it right!

Now, what do I mean about “doing it right”? Some of these sites, you might notice, do implement some things with JavaScript. But here’s the secret: if you turn JavaScript off, these sites still work just fine. The content doesn’t just disappear. The JavaScript effects and features have fallbacks! Sites are progressively enhanced, or they degrade gracefully.

Either way: they work. And they’re kind of hard to find, these days.

1. Amazon

You might expect a site with as much information present on any given page as Amazon has to use a mountain of JavaScript to, in some way, organize it more efficiently. Not so. Turn off the JS, and you can buy stuff just fine.

2. The Warren Trust

The Warren Trust is another one that degrades quite gracefully. With JS on, the site uses AJAX techniques to load content from other pages without technically...

Unlike mobile applications, the web has no set design guidelines to which a designer can refer. Instead, each web project tends to be a blank canvas. There are frameworks like Material, Bootstrap, and others which provide a base, but no set guidelines which span the web as a whole.

The result is a wide-ranging and diverse web, but one with a lack of cohesiveness, particularly in terms of user experience. Navigations differ in placement, structure, and overall design. Layouts alternate in width. Text sizes and typographic scales vary wildly. And a wide range of differing components, interactions, and user interface elements are used.

Design systems ensure consistency between apps, resulting in a more cohesive product

The lack of a set design system for the web is due to its open source nature, and lack of ownership. No company or organization has the power to enforce guidelines or standards. The closest anything or anyone comes to impacting the way we design is Google, who can affect your search rankings based on factors such as user experience, responsiveness, and code structure. On the other hand, mobile operating systems like iOS and Android have the power to enforce certain application structures, user experience practices, and standards. Design systems ensure consistency between apps, resulting in a more cohesive product, and one that is easier to use and understand for the end user. It also enhances performance and optimization, as well as accessibility.

Start 2018 by deleting some of those old tools from your computer that you never use in favor of some fresh, new options. While old favorites can be great for a while, there are so many great new elements out there that can streamline your workflow, or help add more creative spark to projects.

If we’ve missed something that you think should have been on the list, let us know in the comments. And if you know of a new app or resource that should be featured next month, tweet it to @carriecousins to be considered!

Let’s Enhance

Do you ever have an image that is just too small for what you need? Let’s Enhance is here to solve that problem. The free tool allows you to upload an image—just drag and drop—and it will remove JPEG artifacts and upscale by up to four times the original size without losing any quality. (And it actually works!) State of the art neural networks are used to help removed image noise and imagines missing details for images that look totally natural.

Design Principles

The open-source Design Principles project is a collection of resources that are the basis for good projects. According to the curator, “Design Principles help teams with decision making. A few simple principles or constructive questions will guide your team towards making appropriate decisions.” You can browse more than 1,000 principles and examples already in the...

Every week users submit a lot of interesting stuff on our sister site Webdesigner News, highlighting great content from around the web that can be of interest to web designers. 

The best way to keep track of all the great stories and news being posted is simply to check out the Webdesigner News site, however, in case you missed some here’s a quick and useful compilation of the most popular designer news that we curated from the past week.

Note that this is only a very small selection of the links that were posted, so don’t miss out and subscribe to our newsletter and follow the site daily for all the news.

Best WordPress Design Trends for 2018

 

5 Typography Trends for 2018

 

Coke’s New Font is Design at its Worst

 

Company Tricks People into Swiping Instagram Ad with Fake Strand of Hair

 

Golden Ratio. Bring Balance in UI Design

 

Gradient Cards – A Simple and Beautiful List of Editable Gradients

 

The 7 Best Design Case Studies of 2017

 

Goodbye IPod, and Thanks for all the Tunes

 

I’m Harvesting Credit Card...

Every week we feature a set of comics created exclusively for WDD.

The content revolves around web design, blogging and funny situations that we encounter in our daily lives as designers.

These great cartoons are created by Jerry King, an award-winning cartoonist who’s one of the most published, prolific and versatile cartoonists in the world today.

So for a few moments, take a break from your daily routine, have a laugh and enjoy these funny cartoons.

Feel free to leave your comments and suggestions below as well as any related stories of your own…

Shot of tolerance

Liquid inspiration

 

The multitasker

Can you relate to these situations? Please share your funny stories and comments below…

Beautiful Handwritten Madelyn Script Family – only $17!

Source

Gamification as a concept has been around just long enough for a number of experts to come out of nowhere. There was a brief moment where everybody wrote an article or five about it, and then it more or less became the preserve of “gamification experts” and business blogs.

The thing is, we should still be thinking about it. Buzzword or not, it’s often incredibly effective.

So, for the beginners: gamification is the practice of putting game-like features, mechanics, and sometimes UI elements into your website or app.

In this article, we’re taking a look at several different forms of gamification, and how they’ve been implemented across the Internet. You’ll probably have seen some of these before, but you might not have thought of these as game-like features. Also, I’m sticking to websites and web apps (you almost have to try to find a mobile app that doesn’t have some form of gamification).

1. Habitica

Game elements: experience points, levels, upgrades, gear, and more.

Habitica is probably the single most direct application of game design principles and mechanics that I’ve seen in a web app. Why? Because it basically is a game. Well, the app’s stated purpose is to help you form new good habits, and kick bad ones.

They attempt to do this through the rather direct application of roleplaying game mechanics. Spend time on your new habit, you get points. Succumb to old habits, lose points. Enough points gets you upgrades, and so on.

An online shop’s shipping methods or rates have a significant impact on decreasing cart abandonment rates and driving up additional sales. Customers are just as attracted by low shipping rates, fast shipping options, and good packaging, as they are enticed by competitive market rates of products.

Ecommerce sites that have not yet mastered the complexities of shipping are unable to reach their full sales potential. Many new business owners grossly underestimate the importance of shipping cost, which can have the most impact on the overall expense it takes to get a product moving. Moreover, these online shops risk their business being run down as a result of the costs due to shipping mistakes eating into their profits.

Fortunately, with a little research and careful planning most of these mistakes are easy to identify and avoid. Avoiding the 10 common shipping mistakes listed below can help any online shop owner become a savvy e-retailer.

1. Not Letting Customers Choose a Shipping Option

Customers enjoy having multiple shipping options since every customer is likely to have different delivery expectations. Some may have an important event, like an anniversary or birthday, just around the corner so they will prioritize fast shipping to get the ordered gift on time. Others may be more interested in saving some extra bucks through free shipping. Your shop will automatically become undesirable if it does not provide suitable shipping options to accommodate customers with specific parcel arrival time or shipping cost preference.

Customers are...

Setting up an e-Commerce site? Or looking for some high-quality icons to give your shopping a professional look. From the fine folks at Icons8 we’re offering this awesome set of 40 different iOS 11 glyphs icons dedicated to eCommerce. All icons are provided as PNG, SVG and EPS. Check the license here

 

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MOTOPRESS: WordPress Page Builder with Premium Extensions – 84% off! ...

If you are bored with everything you’ve been toying with in design projects, the start of a new year is a great time to try something new. While the end of the year, can be a slow season when it comes to web design projects, the start of the year is often when new work and concepts come to life.

It can also be the start of a few new design trends such as simple corner branding, skinny vertical sidebars and peachy color choices—all of which are popping up in plenty of projects.

Here’s what’s trending in design this month:

1. Simple Corner Branding

Maybe it seems way too simple, but a text branding mark in the top left corner of websites has made a comeback. While some of these simple corner branding styles include a text-based mark or text and an icon, the trend is defined by streamlined elements that fall into the background.

These marks generally use simple sans serif typefaces and are white on a colored background or include a simple color element when used on light backgrounds. Black branding on a white background is equally popular. There’s an overall lack of embellishment or desire to make the logotype a focal point.

This trend seems to be popular with brands that don’t have well-established names yet—think startups or small businesses—or with website designs that are fairly elaborate. For the more involved designs, such as Papercast, the messaging and description of what the website...

Every week users submit a lot of interesting stuff on our sister site Webdesigner News, highlighting great content from around the web that can be of interest to web designers. 

The best way to keep track of all the great stories and news being posted is simply to check out the Webdesigner News site, however, in case you missed some here’s a quick and useful compilation of the most popular designer news that we curated from the past week.

Note that this is only a very small selection of the links that were posted, so don’t miss out and subscribe to our newsletter and follow the site daily for all the news.

10 Tools and Apps that Made Me a Better Designer in 2017

 

10 Logo design Trends that will Dominate 2018

 

An A-Z Checklist for 2018

 

Web Design Inspiration

 

Which JavaScript Frameworks Should You Learn in 2018?

 

The Most Hearted Pens of 2017

 

12 Points to Improve your Website in 2018

 

5 UX Design Principles that Never Go Out of Style

 

10 Must-Read Design Books to Get You Ready for...

Using a living style guide (LSG) to drive development is a practice that is gaining a lot of popularity because it has many advantages, including code efficiency and UI consistency. But, how can you create one? What should you include? And where do you even start? In this tutorial I will delve into the nitty-gritty details of creating a living style using DocumentCSS.

The Beauty of Living Style Guides

Similar to a standard style guide, a living style guide provides a set of standards for the use and creation of styles for an application. In the case of a standard style guide, the purpose is to maintain brand cohesiveness and prevent the misuse of graphics and design elements. In the same way LSGs are used to maintain consistency in an application and to guide their implementation. But what makes a LSG different and more powerful is that much of its information comes right from the source code, making it easy and efficient to reflect the evolving state of an application.

Even today it’s mind blowing to learn that you can use the source code of your application for building your style guide.

If you look at the examples below you will see the common denominators of a LSG are:

  • A list of the elements that are documented
  • Succinct documentation with code snippets and interactive UI demonstrations

Lonely Planet Style Guide

And it’s here! January 2018 has arrived in all its cold, cold glory, and I just spent the first few days of it looking at portfolio sites. I do it all for you, dear Readers. I do it all for you.

This month doesn’t have a particularly specific theme, unless you count pretty much every variation of minimalism. There’s nothing completely new, and nothing completely old. I’m seeing more and more effort being made to strike a balance between extreme design philosophies, and I have to say that I’m quite liking some of the results.

Note: I’m judging these sites by how good they look to me. If they’re creative and original, or classic but really well-done, it’s all good to me. Sometimes, UX and accessibility suffer. For example, many of these sites depend on JavaScript to display their content at all; this is a Bad Idea (TM), kids. If you find an idea you like and want to adapt to your own site, remember to implement it responsibly.

CRUX

CRUX takes home the award for commitment to a concept. They work a lot with video, so they went and applied the timeline concept to the navigation on their one-pager. We’ve seen this once before in a previous portfolio article, but CRUX takes a less minimalist approach to the concept.

Fons Hickmann

Fons Hickmann’s portfolio is a shiny new example of what I’m calling the “Brutal Powerpoint”...

Come one, come all! There are new(ish) top level domains for sale, and we’re here to tell you all about them! Okay, for the uninitiated, top level domains are basically those little bits at the end of a website’s home address. You know, “.com”, “.org”, “.net”, etc. If you have a website, you could be paying anywhere from $15 to $10,000 USD a year for one, depending on how popular the keywords are. Well now there are a bunch of new ones out there.

.com and its siblings are getting more expensive as time goes on, and there are fewer good ones to go around. Some people get around this by drastically misspelling words, making really long domain names, or just getting unusually creative.

On the other hand, you can just buy a domain with a new TLD. It’s cheaper. It’s probably available. And whatever industry you’re into, or wherever you are, there is most likely a TLD for it somewhere. In this article, I’ve focused on the options that might best suit web designers and developers, with a few odd extras sprinkled in.

Note: These can confuse some people. I told one guy that a website was at “example.works” (not the real domain), and he was confused for quite a bit ’til I explained that “.works” was a thing, now. So yeah, not everybody is caught up yet. But hey, that’s what we’re here for!

Other note: I’ve included some personal recommendations for when...

Every week we feature a set of comics created exclusively for WDD.

The content revolves around web design, blogging and funny situations that we encounter in our daily lives as designers.

These great cartoons are created by Jerry King, an award-winning cartoonist who’s one of the most published, prolific and versatile cartoonists in the world today.

So for a few moments, take a break from your daily routine, have a laugh and enjoy these funny cartoons.

Feel free to leave your comments and suggestions below as well as any related stories of your own…

Good design, bad food

A long 5 minutes

 

Anger management bill

Can you relate to these situations? Please share your funny stories and comments below…

LAST DAY: Cliche – A Beautiful Hand-Lettered Brush Font – only $7!

Source

From simply ordering food to booking appointments, hiring services, and or even making bids, customers use online shopping as a friendly, and efficient way to shop.

Establishing an online store as unique in its niche is essential for staying ahead of competitors. As the number of consumers increases on a daily basis, online stores have started deploying chatbots to engage customers. Here are 10 ways chatbots can be used to meet the needs of customers, and store owners, some of which may surprise you…

1. Gathering Customer Data

Chatbots are steadily becoming a major source for gathering data. They manage this because they gather far more customer data than any other form of analytics. Nuances in speech, response times, even typing accuracy can be mined as big data sets to understand users.

More importantly, rather that being generalized data, the information gathered is niche specific, and so far more valuable to a site’s owners.

2. Streamlined Store Management

Chatbots can be easily integrated within an online store which allows tasking of multiple operations from a single control point, be it a window or the dashboard. Rather than focusing on developing an application, stores can optimize their services since no application is required for users to gain access to facilities.

3. Greater Outreach

While mainstream marketing strategies provide a significant degree of success, chatbots bring an untapped potential for higher outreach on ecommerce stores. Through them, specific target groups can be catered uniquely, allowing each potential lead to be dealt...

If you’re like most talented designers, you have an eye for aesthetics. You understand beauty, design, and symmetry at an almost fundamental level. It’s not just a nice-to-have, it’s an essential component that shapes how you see the world.

That’s the problem.

Most of the people around you, the people you work with, don’t get it. They don’t have an eye for design. They don’t understand the principles of design.

Designers Are Often Punished For Their Talents

Many designers are abused, neglected and taken for granted. It’s not supposed to be this way. It doesn’t have to be this way, but for many creatives, it is.

Designing Is Amazing, When You’re In Control

Most of the time, you’re not in control are you? Most of the time you’re asked to create something you know isn’t very good. How many times have you heard a variation of, “Make it pop?” But, it’s more than that.

As a designer, you have an eye for aesthetics. You’re unconsciously aware of form, structure and layout in a way that non-designers are not. If you’re like most designers, you see the elements of design everywhere. If you’re a talented designer you’re orderly, observant and intelligent. You see and understand far more details than you share. It’s the hallmark of a brilliant designer.

Here’s why this is a problem.

Designers Are Consistently Required To Create Ugly, Poorly Performing Work For Incompetent People

When I say ugly I’m not just talking about work that’s visually unappealing. I’m talking...