Gaming
Entertainment
Music
Sports
Business
Technology
News
Design
Fitness
Science
Histoy
Travel
Animals
DIY
Fun
Style
Photography
Lifestyle
Food
2018-04-25T20:16:37.815Z
0
{"feed":"The-Minimalists","feedTitle":"The Minimalists","feedLink":"/feed/The-Minimalists","catTitle":"Lifestyle","catLink":"/cat/lifestyle"}
By Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus ·

In this episode of The Minimalists Podcast, Joshua & Ryan talk about new beginnings, starting over, creating new habits, walking away from bad situations, health problems, and losing weight, and they answer the following questions:

  • What items should I keep, sell, donate, or recycle before I move to a new residence?
  • How can minimalism help me adopt an appropriate diet?
  • How do I build the confidence necessary to undertake a new beginning in my life?
  • How do I overcome the fear of stepping outside my comfort zone to start a new career?
Stream

https://soundcloud.com/theminimalists/p129/

Subscribe

Apple Podcasts · Google Play · Spotify · Soundcloud · YouTube · MP3

Minimal Maxims

Joshua & Ryan’s pithy, shareable, less-than-140-character responses. Find more quotes from The Minimalists at MinimalMaxims.com.

  • “The good life is birthed from great habits.”
  • “Routines are ‘shoulds’; habits are ‘musts.’”
  • “You will become what you focus on.”
  • “Apologizing to yourself for your past is an effective way to accept and let go.”
  • “Starting over requires forgiving yourself and moving forward in a way that aligns with your values and beliefs.”
  • “Change isn’t impossible—it’s incremental.”
  • “We needn’t let go of everything to move on.”
  • “A life of surplus comfort isn’t a life well-lived.”
  • “Comfort is the place in which we grow and learn the least.”
  • “We learn from what we’ve learned.”
  • “You must live on the edge of your comfort...
By Joshua Fields Millburn ·

There’s a direct correlation between a man’s weakness and his ability to say “I’m sorry”—at least that’s what I used to believe.

In my imagined world of yesteryear, I thought that if wanted to be indomitable—if I wanted to be a real man (whatever that means)—then I should refuse to apologize at all costs because an apology is a sign of fragility.

So I puffed out my chest and held my head high, even when I was dead wrong (especially when I was dead wrong). I refused to acknowledge my faults because I confused flawlessness with fortitude. And since I believed perfection was power, I was afraid to be vulnerable.

How silly.

Think about it.

In the real world…

Apologizing is the epitome of strength: it requires integrity, character, backbone.

An apology isn’t a justification for our negligent actions; it lets others know we hear them, we understand them, and we respect their feelings. An apology is considerate: it shows people we recognize the problem, and it is the most rational step toward a solution because a solution is impossible to find if we pretend the problem doesn’t exist.

Refusing to apologize, on the other hand, ignores the problem, providing it space to fester, to grow, and, eventually, to explode.

So, we can act like a child, we can be weak, we...

By Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus ·

Six questions worth asking before spending money on a good or service:

1. Who am I buying this for?

2. Will this add value to my life?

3. Can I afford it?

4. Is this the best use of this money?

5. What’s the actual cost?

6. Would the best version of me buy this?

Subscribe to The Minimalists via email.

The post Questions to Ask Before Purchasing appeared first on The Minimalists.

By Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus ·

In this episode of The Minimalists Podcast, Joshua & Ryan talk about resetting, taking breaks, prioritizing, healing, and finding time to recover, and they answer the following questions:

  • What role can minimalism play in healing?
  • How can I get the alone time I need between a full schedule and a full house?
  • How do I prioritize tasks that are important but not urgent?
  • How can a minimalist stay a minimalist when they live in a non-minimalist environment?
Stream

https://soundcloud.com/theminimalists/p128/

Subscribe

Apple Podcasts · Google Play · Spotify · Soundcloud · YouTube · MP3

Minimal Maxims

Joshua & Ryan’s pithy, shareable, less-than-140-character responses. Find more quotes from The Minimalists at MinimalMaxims.com.

  • “Enough is never enough when we have the wrong mindset.”
  • “What’s urgent usually isn’t what’s important.”
  • “To make your habits a priority, make your habits both important and urgent.”
  • “When it comes to prioritizing, calendar is the ally and procrastination is the enemy.”
  • “Even a great excuse is still an excuse.”
  • “A person who blames others for their discontentment will always rely on others for their contentment.”
  • “If you wait around for everyone else to become a minimalist before you become a minimalist, you will never yourself become a minimalist.”
Mentioned in This Episode
By Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus ·

The things we own don’t tell the world who we are, but, sadly, they often communicate who we want to be. When this happens, we mistakenly let our possessions shape our identity.

The logoed shirts.
The luxury vehicles.
The stacks of unread books.
The up-to-date smartphones.
The drawers brimming with cosmetics.
The mementos from our last vacation.

We spend money we don’t have to buy things we don’t need to impress people we don’t know.

What a cycle.

We showcase our favorite brands in a futile effort to signify our individuality: See this shiny new thing? This is who I am! Our logos make us feel unique, just like everybody else.

The brands themselves aren’t the problem, though: we all need some stuff, so we rely on brands to create the things we need. The problem arises when we feel external pressure to acquire, as if new trinkets are a shortcut to a more complete life.

That external pressure shouldn’t be a sign to consume. If anything, it’s a sign to pause and ask, “Who am I buying this for?”

Is that new thing for you?
Or are you buying it to project an image?

If it’s truly for you—and it makes sense to purchase—then, by all means, go ahead, get it. Let’s not deprive ourselves of the things that...

By Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus ·

In recent decades, the American Dream has been replaced by consumerism, gluttony, and multiple drug epidemics. Yes, these troubles are undeniably real, but perhaps they are symptoms of a larger problem.

Maybe we’re buying nonessentials because we’re looking for something we’ve lost. Maybe we’re overeating because we’re trying to fill a void. Maybe we don’t have an opioid crisis so much as we have a crisis of meaning.

To find meaning is to find something that fulfills us, that propels us forward during the finite time we have on Earth. Hoarding, gourmandism, and substance abuse do the opposite: these addictions drag us in a direction we don’t want to travel.

The antidote, then, isn’t to simply abstain from everything. Abstinence alone leaves a void. Rather, we must walk toward the activities that provide purpose in our daily lives—creativity, community, contribution—to walk away from our vices.

Subscribe to The Minimalists via email.

The post Crisis of Meaning appeared first on The Minimalists.

By Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus ·

In this episode of The Minimalists Podcast, Joshua & Ryan chat with Derek Sivers about simplicity, complexity, parenting, creativity, and saying “no” to almost everything, and they answer the following questions:

  • How do I prioritize the most important things in my life once I’ve eliminated the clutter?
  • How do I say ‘no’ to gifts and donations from my loved ones for my newborn without looking like an unappreciative jerk?
  • How do I stay present with my loved ones when there are so many pressing demands on my time from my professional life?
  • How do I ensure I stay committed to my minimalism journey?
Stream

Subscribe

Apple Podcasts · Google Play · Spotify · Soundcloud · YouTube · MP3

Minimal Maxims

Joshua & Ryan’s pithy, shareable, less-than-140-character responses. Find more quotes from The Minimalists at MinimalMaxims.com.

  • “Common sense ain’t so common.”
  • “To take back control of our lives we must practice saying ‘no’ more frequently so we can say ‘yes’ to what’s truly important.”
  • “If all you’re doing is aspiring, then you’ll end up with aspiration all over the place.”
Mentioned in This Episode
By Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus ·

In this episode of The Minimalists Podcast, Joshua & Ryan talk about some of their favorite high-quality items, and they discuss finding a balance between quality and quantity. They also answer the following questions:

  • How do I transition to buying quality over quantity?
  • What brands of products and services do you recommend to other minimalists?
  • What’s the best approach to fight that programmed obsolescence that is engineered by big companies?
  • What is your definition of quality?
Stream

Subscribe

Apple Podcasts · Google Play · Spotify · Soundcloud · YouTube · MP3

Minimal Maxims

Joshua & Ryan’s pithy, shareable, less-than-140-character responses. Find more quotes from The Minimalists at MinimalMaxims.com.

  • “Most items are obsolete before we buy them.”
  • “There’s always going to be a better version around the corner. And around that corner. And around that corner. Stop worrying about the better version of a material possession and focus on being a better version of yourself—one doesn’t need to buy anything to do that.”
  • “Raising one’s standards increases the quality of one’s life.”
  • “Quality is perspectival.”
  • “Quality increases with necessary effort.”
Mentioned in This Episode
By Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus ·

In this episode of The Minimalists Podcast, Joshua & Ryan talk about Easter, corporatism, and letting go, and they answer the following questions:

  • How can I tactfully let loved ones know I don’t want any Easter gifts for my family?
  • Do you believe you still would have adopted minimalism if it hadn’t been for those tragic events in your life years ago?
  • How do I help my loved ones stay motivated to maintain minimalist practices?
  • How can minimalism better address corporatism and its burgeoning waste?
  • What are some prime examples of products and services that fraudulently market themselves as minimalist or essentialist?
Stream

Subscribe

Apple Podcasts · Google Play · Spotify · Soundcloud · YouTube · MP3

Minimal Maxims

Joshua & Ryan’s pithy, shareable, less-than-140-character responses. Find more quotes from The Minimalists at MinimalMaxims.com.

  • “Instead of saying ‘no,’ tell them what you’re saying ‘yes’ to.”
  • “There are five transformative words to use whenever you’re asking something of others: ‘Would you be willing to…?’”
  • “It doesn’t take a car crash to become a safer driver, but sometimes that’s what it takes to wake us up.”
  • “Common sense ain’t so common these days.”
  • “Ask yourself, ‘How might my life be better with less?’”
  • “Alone we can’t be the change—we can only be the voice. But everyone we touch can be an...
By Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus ·

In this episode of The Minimalists Podcast, Joshua & Ryan chat with Rob Bell and Andrew Morgan about religion, spirituality, and their new documentary, The Heretic, and together they answer the following questions:

  • What are a minimalist’s views on religion?
  • What resources do you recommend for those interested in incorporating spirituality into their minimalist practices?
  • Was it painful when the church turned its back on you, and, if so, how did you move past the pain?
  • Do you accept the title of ‘heretic’ like a badge, or do you simply shake it off?
  • Do we actually choose our beliefs, or are they a result of an unconscious process?
Stream

Subscribe

Apple Podcasts · Google Play · Spotify · Soundcloud · YouTube · MP3

Minimal Maxims

Joshua & Ryan’s pithy, shareable, less-than-140-character responses. Find more quotes from The Minimalists at MinimalMaxims.com.

  • “If you’re going to go in, go in all the way.”
  • “It’s easier to give birth than to raise the dead.”
  • “Calling is overrated; curiosity is underrated.”
  • “And then what?”
  • “We must walk away to move on.”
  • “You don’t need clergy to confirm you’re excelling in life.”
  • “Your beliefs are a path to your values.”
  • “As a human being, you’re a vitamix of nature and nurture, of impulse and instinct—so, a practice, a religion, can be incredibly helpful to...
By Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus ·

In this episode of The Minimalists Podcast, Joshua & Ryan talk about creativity, writing, music, and hobbies with Paul Johnson of Canyon City, and they answer the following questions:

  • How do I reconcile my minimalist values and beliefs with all of the items that are necessary for my hobby?
  • How can I ensure my work space only contains those tools that are absolutely essential?
  • Is it still a hobby if I make money from it?
  • Are hobbies essential for a happy mind?
Stream

Subscribe

Apple Podcasts · Google Play · Spotify · Soundcloud · YouTube · MP3

Minimal Maxims

Joshua & Ryan’s pithy, shareable, less-than-140-character responses. Find more quotes from The Minimalists at MinimalMaxims.com.

  • “It is impossible to have the peaks without the valleys.”
  • “Constraints breed creativity.”
  • “Always leave room to exhale after each inhale.”
  • “Don’t write stories in lieu of living them.”
  • “Creativity is portable.”
  • “Having Jimi Hendrix’s guitar does not make you Jimi Hendrix.”
  • “If the outcome is income, it’s not a hobby.”
  • “Forcing yourself to make money from a hobby is a great way to kill your love for that hobby.”
  • “A hobby is something you do for pure joy.”
  • “Pursuing happiness is a fool’s errand.”
  • “Essential is perspectival.”
  • “Hobbies aren’t the way to happiness, but they do make life far more interesting.”
Mentioned in This Episode
By Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus ·

Create less.
Consume more.
Crave nonessentials.
Regard everything as precious.
Refuse to let go.
Stare at the rearview.
Espouse cynicism.
Feign sincerity.
Channel surf.
Watch the news.
Peruse social media.
Inhabit the email inbox.
Focus on productivity.
Compare achievements.
Yearn for success.
Forsake sleep.
Forgo exercise.
Seek quantity.
Disregard quality.
Hide from fear.
Reject help.
Hold grudges.
Flout gratitude.
Ignore friendships.
Expand the to-do list.
Embrace perfectionism.
Stay busy.
Hurry.
Take on debt.
Go to the mall.
Fabricate goals.
Raise expectations.
Lower standards.
Overpromise.
Underdeliver.
Spend more.
Save less.
Rely on handouts.
Shun contribution.
Think only about self.
Ruminate on the unchangeable.
Say yes to everything.
Subscribe to The Minimalists via email.

By Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus ·

In this episode of The Minimalists Podcast, Joshua & Ryan talk about how to live as a minimalist and still respect the important people in their lives, and they answer the following questions:

  • How do I find common ground with my houseful of non-minimalist roommates?
  • How do I find a balance with my non-minimalist partner?
  • How do I minimize the friends, family, and colleagues in my life that insist on tearing me down instead of building me up?
  • How do I overcome my introversion to develop strong, enriching relationships with others?
Stream

Subscribe

Apple Podcasts · Google Play · Spotify · Soundcloud · YouTube · MP3

Minimal Maxims

Joshua & Ryan’s pithy, shareable, less-than-140-character responses. Find more quotes from The Minimalists at MinimalMaxims.com.

  • “Give all you can give and take only what you need.”
  • “Lead by example and you’ll raise the standards of everyone in your life—and they, in turn, will raise yours.”
  • “On a long enough timeline, everything is temporary.”
  • “Raise your standards and lower your expectations.”
  • “Hurt people hurt people.”
  • “Misery encourages others to pull up a chair and stay awhile.”
  • “Distance creates the room necessary to let go.”
  • “You can’t change the people around you, but you can change the people around you.”
  • “It’s possible to show love and support from any distance.”
  • “No values, no self; know your...
By Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus ·

Derek Sivers embodies simplicity.

You may know him from his popular TED Talks. Or you may know him as the author of Anything You Want. Or you may know him as the founder of CD Baby or from his online public musings or because of his unconventional life.

And if you listen to our podcast, you know Derek’s writing has helped shaped The Minimalists’ worldview over the years. Those unfamiliar with his work should read these short, useful articles:

No “yes.” Either “HELL YEAH!” or “no.”
Why I gave my company to charity
Why I don’t want stuff
Solitary Socialite

In his first public appearance in three years, Derek Sivers is going to join The Minimalists live on stage at our event in Auckland, New Zealand, on 17 March 2018. We’ll have a conversation about minimalism, advertisements, marketing, creativity, priorities, nomadic lifestyles, parenting, and more.

What an exciting way to end to our Less Is Now Tour! You can get tickets to that event, and our six upcoming Australian events, on our tour page.

Subscribe to The Minimalists via email.
By Joshua Fields Millburn ·

If the following screed were a peer-reviewed journal article, its abstract would be brief: advertisements suck.

Well, at least most of them do.

That’s not to say that all advertising is inherently evil, or even bad, because not all advertisements are created equal—they run the gamut from informative to downright destructive.

To understand the inherent problems with advertisements, it’s important to first point out that advertising isn’t the same thing as marketing. Though these two terms are often used interchangeably, they are different in practice.

Advertisements

Advertisements are paid announcements via a public medium—mattress commercials, “infomercials” for the latest exercise fad, and seemingly harmless adverts for harmful prescription drugs—and they are generally not an endorsement by the platform on which they are displayed.

In Latin, advertere means “to turn toward,” and that’s the exact aim of today’s ad agencies: they’re willing to pay heaps of money to turn your eyes toward their products and services. And if the demand for a product isn’t as high as the supply, no problem! Advertising can create a false demand if the budget is high enough.

In recent years, worldwide spending on advertising has topped half a trillion dollars a year. Even writing the full number—500,000,000,000.00, commas and all—doesn’t come close to truly understanding its depth.

So let’s put it into perspective: If you leave...

By Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus ·

In this episode of The Minimalists Podcast, Joshua & Ryan invite Courtney Carver into their new studio to talk about emotions, and they answer the following questions:

  • How do I maintain high standards for myself without beating myself up when I fall short of those high standards?
  • How do I let go of resentful feelings I have toward people that cling to their belongings and don’t embrace minimalism?
  • How important is it to take emotion out of all of our important life decisions?
  • Why is being emotional stigmatized while so many of us desire to feel good?
Stream

Subscribe

Apple Podcasts · Google Play · Spotify · Soundcloud · YouTube · MP3

Minimal Maxims

Joshua & Ryan’s pithy, shareable, less-than-140-character responses. Find more quotes from The Minimalists at MinimalMaxims.com.

  • “Maintain high standards and low expectations.”
  • “Wherever focus goes, energy flows.”
  • “Motion moves emotions.”
  • “Emotions are like assholes: everybody needs them.”
  • “Let reason guide you, but let emotions inform your decisions.”
  • “It doesn’t matter what you let guide you as long as your actions align with your values and beliefs.”
  • “Some stigmas are useful, other stigmas are a byproduct of fear—so choose your stigmas wisely.”
  • “The only stigmas that matter are our own.”
Mentioned in This Episode
By Joshua Fields Millburn ·

Are advertisements helpful? Harmful? Both?

Over the past few years, I’ve spent a great deal of time contemplating the overreach of the advertising industry. Last week, after countless hours of research and rumination, I finally finished writing an essay that articulated my thoughts on advertising. It just needed some fine-toothed editing.

But then I accidentally hit “Publish” prematurely, and my unedited screed showed up in hundreds of thousands of inboxes yesterday, replete with myriad typos.

That was a mistake.
My apologies.

My error was especially frustrating because I spent more than three months writing and re-writing this piece. It’s a crucial topic for me, so I wanted to execute it perfectly—not to draw a line in the sand, but to start a conversation about the nature of advertisements.

Publishing the work when it was 98% complete interfered with this conversation. I’m sorry about that, and I’m fixing it.

If it’s in your inbox, please disregard my initial publication, and please accept a few days of necessary cunctation. The completed essay will go out this Wednesday, February 28, 2018, and ideally that’s when the conversation will begin.

Once you read it, I’d love to hear your thoughts on Twitter or Facebook.

Subscribe to The Minimalists via email.
By Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus ·

In this episode of The Minimalists Podcast, Joshua & Ryan are back “in studio” to talk about how they’re using social media in 2018, and they answer the following questions:

  • What advice do you have for those that want to use social media more intentionally for their business?
  • How do I create a social media strategy for my business without sacrificing my personal privacy?
  • How do I determine the line between too much and just enough when I use social media for promotion?
  • Did you discover a newfound value or a lack of value regarding social media after being off of it?
  • Did your absence from social media make you realize it made your life more meaningful, or did it make you realize it’s just a modern platform to advertise?
Stream

Subscribe

Apple Podcasts · Google Play · Spotify · Soundcloud · YouTube · MP3

Minimal Maxims

Joshua & Ryan’s pithy, shareable, less-than-140-character responses. Find more quotes from The Minimalists at MinimalMaxims.com.

  • “We are nothing more than dogs thrashing in the collars of our self-imposed demands.”
  • “If it feels like too much, it’s too much.”
  • “Before using social media, ask yourself: How can I use this tool as little as possible and still add value to the various platforms people love?”
  • “A paintbrush can create a...
By Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus ·

In this episode of The Minimalists Podcast, Joshua & Ryan are back “in studio” to talk about decorations, and they answer the following questions:

  • Are non-functional decorative items appropriate in a minimalist’s home and work environments?
  • How can I reconcile my need to minimize my possessions when others’ perceptions of my personal and professional statuses rely on those possessions?
  • How do I address the unsightliness of my child’s collections?
  • How do I curate an art collection as a minimalist?
Stream

Subscribe

Apple Podcasts · Google Play · Spotify · Soundcloud · YouTube · MP3

Minimal Maxims

Joshua & Ryan’s pithy, shareable, less-than-140-character responses. Find more quotes from The Minimalists at MinimalMaxims.com.

  • “Step slowly to avoid going too far.”
  • “If someone likes you for who you are trying to be, then it is not you that they like.”
  • “Our choices influence other people.”
  • “As parents, we teach our children to pick their battles, but we, too, must pick our battles carefully.”
  • “A parent’s job is not to order their children around; a parent’s job is to set boundaries.”
  • “No matter what, you can always say ‘no.’”
  • “Art extends beyond the framed objects on our walls.”
  • “Buy art only if you love it, you have room for it, and you don’t have to go into debt to acquire it.”
Mentioned in This Episode
  • Tour:...
By Joshua Fields Millburn & Ryan Nicodemus ·

In this episode of The Minimalists Podcast, Joshua & Ryan are back “in studio” to talk about collecting, and they answer the following questions:

  • How do I reconcile my collector’s mindset with the principles of minimalist philosophy?
  • How do I appropriately purge my medals and trophies?
  • How do I express my minimalist viewpoint regarding my loved ones’ collections without offending my loved ones?
  • What fuels people’s desires to collect in the first place?
Stream

Subscribe

Apple Podcasts · Google Play · Spotify · Soundcloud · YouTube · MP3

Minimal Maxims

Joshua & Ryan’s pithy, shareable, less-than-140-character responses. Find more quotes from The Minimalists at MinimalMaxims.com.

  • “Ensure collecting doesn’t interfere with living.”
  • “Trophies look back; champions look forward.”
  • “Clutter is in the eye of the beholder.”
  • “Better questions lead to better solutions.”
  • “Asking loved ones for support is the best help you can ask for.”
  • “We often collect things to mask our hoarding.”
  • “Insecurity leads to collecting.”
  • “Completing the collection will not make you complete.”
  • “Embrace the incompleteness.”
Mentioned in This Episode