Gaming
Entertainment
Music
Sports
Business
Technology
News
Design
Fitness
Science
Histoy
Travel
Animals
DIY
Fun
Style
Photography
Lifestyle
Food
2018-07-20T00:40:54.497Z
0
{"feed":"The-Atlantic-Photo","feedTitle":"The Atlantic Photo","feedLink":"/feed/The-Atlantic-Photo","catTitle":"Photography","catLink":"/cat/photography"}

In south central China’s Guizhou province sits Qiandongnan Miao and Dong Autonomous Prefecture, home to nearly four million people—approximately 50% from the ethnic Miao group, and 30% from the ethnic Dong people. The mountainous landscape is lined with terraced farm fields, the valleys dotted with villages made up of traditional wooden structures, and the local festivals burst with color.

High in the Maluti Mountains of the Kingdom of Lesotho, sits Afriski, one of only two ski resorts in southern Africa (the other, Tiffindell, is in the same mountains, just over the border in South Africa.) The resort summit is about 10,600 feet (3,222 m) above sea level, with a slope running about 1 kilometer. Much of the winter, snow on the ground can be sparse, so snow-making machines fill in the gaps, creating a giant white stripe on the treeless landscape. AFP photographer Marco Longari visited Afriski last week, capturing images of the skiers and snowboarders playing and training at this remote resort.

The Royal Air Force celebrates its centennial in London, World Cup emotions run high in Russia and around the world, a chili pepper eating contest takes place in China, the Running of the Bulls begins in Spain, a leopard gets a check-up in the Netherlands, Tour de France riders pass through stage six, flamingos stride through a lake in Turkey, and much more.

...

Over the weekend, sustained heavy rainfall hit parts of western and central Japan, causing flash flooding, setting off landslides, submerging floodplains, and forcing more than two million residents to evacuate. Today, Japan’s National Police Agency announced at least 200 people had died, with dozens still missing, in the worst weather-related disaster to hit Japan in more than 30 years. More than 70,000 rescue workers are at work in hard-hit areas, searching for survivors, as the damage to villages, roads, and infrastructure is being assessed—hundreds of thousands of homes remain without power or clean water.

In central Italy's Umbria region, the small village of Castelluccio sits atop a hill overlooking a broad, flat basin surrounded by the Sibilline Mountains. In October of 2016, a significant earthquake struck the area, badly damaging the village and roads—but farming still takes place in the Piano Grande below, where fields of lentils and poppies bloom every year, carpeting the landscape with a colorful quilt of blossoming flowers.

...

In parts of Ukraine, Belarus, Poland, and Russia, an ancient pagan summer rite called Kupala combined with the traditional orthodox feast of St. John the Baptist, becoming Ivan Kupala night, a festival celebrating the summer solstice. On Ivan Kupala night, young people wear wreaths symbolizing purity, people sing and dance around bonfires, and bathe naked in rivers and lakes. Many gather up their courage and and leap over fires as a test of faith, and to purge themselves of their sins and bad luck, and improve their health. Collected here, a handful of images from Ivan Kupala night celebrations in recent years.

The winners of the the ninth annual Audubon Photography Awards competition have just been announced.  Photographers entered images in three categories: professional, amateur, and youth. More than 8,000 images depicting birdlife from all 50 states and 10 Canadian provinces were judged. This year’s competition celebrates the 100th anniversary of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and the many bird species protected by this conservation law. The National Audubon Society was kind enough to share some of this year’s winners and runners-up with us below. To view even more great bird photography, you can also see all of the top 100 entries at the Audubon website.

Cooling off in New York City, rescue operations in Thailand, World Cup action in Russia, migrants crossing the Mediterranean, a triathlon in Germany, wildfires in California, a presidential election in Mexico, a rocket explodes in Japan, and much more.

In northern Thailand, hundreds of international rescue workers spent the past ten days searching for a group of twelve boys, ages between 11 to 16, and their 25-year-old soccer coach who became trapped in a cave after flooding caused by relentless monsoon rains. Late on July 2, rescue teams discovered all of the boys and their coach alive and in relatively good health, sheltering deep inside the cave complex. Outside the caves, recent days have been difficult for family and friends, who gathered to pray and await any news. Now that they have been found, rescue still remains a difficult task—much of the return trip is under water, and even though pumps are removing a lowering the water level, the rainfall is not letting up. Thai officials are reportedly weighing options that include waiting for passages to become dry enough, or providing the boys with diving gear and having them swim through some submerged sections.

Across the country yesterday, hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets in small towns and big cities to march and voice their opposition to the Trump administration’s immigration policies. Demonstrators in more than 700 locations called for the swift reunification of immigrant families separated by border agencies, and an end to the policies that cause so many separations. Collected here, photos from Indianapolis, Boston, Denver, Los Angeles, Chicago, Salt Lake City, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., and more.

A firearms course for teachers in Colorado, Saudi Arabia lifts its ban on women drivers, immigration policy protests in Washington, D.C. and Los Angeles, the World's Ugliest Dog Competition in California, a spider hunts along a Russian river, Fashion Week in Dakar, Banksy surfaces in Paris, a dramatic moonrise above a burning moorland in England, and much more.

The winning images have been selected from this year’s edition of the National Geographic Travel Photographer of the Year competition, with the grand prize being awarded to Reiko Takahashi for her image of a humpback whale calf swimming near Japan’s Kumejima Island. National Geographic was kind enough to share some of the winning entries with us here, gathered from three categories: Nature, Cities, and People. Be sure to click the link above to see all the winners and the People’s Choice winners as well. The captions were written by the photographers, and lightly edited for style.

Two weeks into the 2018 World Cup, and 42 matches have already been played by 32 national teams in the twelve host arenas in Russia, with the Round of 16 matches set to begin this weekend. Fans from around the world have been cheering, following the drama, and sending their support, either in Russia, or watching from home, riding an emotional rollercoaster as their teams leave it all on the field.

In March, Clodagh Kilcoyne, a Reuters photographer, spent time in the Shamlapur refugee camp in Bangladesh, home to approximately 10,000 of the 700,000 Rohingya Muslim refugees who fled the violence in neighboring Myanmar's Rakhine state. According to Kilcoyne, some of the refugees have now found work in the fishing industry, “earning a tiny daily income and occasional share of the catch, all under the official radar.” Unable to legally work in Bangladesh, refugees support themselves with help from charitable organizations, extended family, and informal jobs such as fishing. Even though the living conditions are harsh in the camps, several Rohingya refugees responded to Kilcyone’s questions with gratitude for where they were, and what that meant—safety from the violence that came for them in Myanmar.

We’ve entered the final week of June, a month celebrated around the world as LGBTQ Pride Month, in colorful parades, vocal protests, public art, and events. The events are a time for celebration, and for recognizing accomplishments and progress as a community, cheered on by supporters, neighbors, and advocates. Many of the month’s events work to continue to raise awareness of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender issues, to promote equality, and to eliminate discrimination. A look now, at Pride 2018 parades and events from around the world.

A watery rescue in Russia, dragon boat racing in China, a soap box derby in France, Hawaiian lava viewed from Earth orbit, a welcome to the summer solstice in the U.K., World Cup celebrations and sadness, International Yoga Day in India, flamingos in Kenya, a boxer dressed as a lion in Germany, and much more.

The Royal Ascot is an annual five-day horse-race meeting held on a course outside of London, England, with racehorses competing for nearly $18 million in prizes. It is a major event for both racing and fashion fans, and is regularly attended by Queen Elizabeth II and other royalty. Parts of the racecourse maintain a “top hats and tails” rule for men, while many women dress in eye-catching outfits, often topped by hats that can be described as architectural, whimsical, grandiose, sculptural, or just over-the-top. Today, a collection of photos of some of these millinery miracles, worn by Royal Ascot racegoers over the past few years.

Getty Images photographer John Moore has won many photojournalism awards throughout his career, bringing a high level of skill, empathy, professionalism, perseverance, and an amazing eye for beauty and color to all of his work. Moore has spent years working along the U.S.-Mexico border, and regularly travels to Mexico and Central America, covering the many issues that surround the ongoing immigration crisis—its root causes in poverty, violence, and hopelessness; the dream of the United States as a better place for individuals and their children; the hazards of the immigrant’s journey; the pursuits and arrests at the border; the faces of those who choose to defend the border and of those who decide to risk everything to cross it. Gathered here, to give some visual context to Moore’s now-famous image of the young girl crying at the border, a collection of photographs taken by Moore over the past two years along the southern U.S. border, Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, and more. And, for more in-depth coverage from John Moore, be sure to check out his new book, Undocumented: Immigration and the Militarization of the United States-Mexico Border.

...

Twenty miles outside of El Paso, Texas, along the U.S.-Mexico border, sits the Tornillo Port of Entry, a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility which was selected by the Trump administration to be the first site for temporary housing for the overflow of unaccompanied minors and the children of detained migrant parents, under the new “zero tolerance” policy.  A quickly-erected tent city inside the facility is currently set up with 450 beds, according to NBC reporting, but is built for expansion. At the moment, it is unclear how many children are being held in Tornillo, but Reuters photographer Mike Blake was able to photograph several dozen teenage boys moving between tents yesterday as he flew over. Via NPR, the reporter John Sepulvado attempted to have a look inside the new tent city, but officials asked him to leave. He spoke with Texas State Representative Mary Gonzalez, who had toured the facility, saying that the tents were air-conditioned and she “felt the kids were at least safe.” The extended weather forecast for Tornillo predicts high temperatures up to 106 degrees Fahrenheit. For further coverage in the Atlantic, see also “Audio: Hear the Voices of Children Detained at the Border” and “The Outrage Over Family Separation Is Exactly What Stephen Miller Wants.”

...

A wee Welsh bunny, trophy winners in Formula E and the French Open, animal rescue near the Fuego volcano in Guatemala, heavy rains in Manila, Eid al-Fitr celebrations in Indonesia, a skyscraper-scaling raccoon in Minnesota, a meeting between President Trump and Kim Jong Un in Singapore, Fashion Week in London, and much more.