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2018-05-22T13:42:18.378Z
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Southeast Alaska, or the Alaska Panhandle, is a narrow strip of coastal islands and mountains that stretches more than 500 miles along the Pacific Ocean. It is home to Alaska’s capital city of Juneau, and was once the seat of power for Russian America, in the town of Sitka. Famed for its wildlife, lush climate, spectacular views, and the protected seaway known as the inside passage, the region has attracted humans since the first people crossed from Asia thousands of years ago. Collected here, a handful of recent images from across southeast Alaska.

Participants at the Wave and Goth festival in Germany, a baby bear in Turkey, attendees at a “Kiss-a-thon” in Mexico City, the 71st Cannes Film Festival in France, a Rocket festival in Thailand, observations of Ramadan in Indonesia, celebrations of the Circus in Budapest, and so much more.

Throughout the 20th century, NASA (and its predecessor, NACA) made extensive use of wind tunnels to test and refine designs for airplanes, spacecraft, and many other vehicles and structures. Dozens of specialized tunnels were constructed over the years at Langley Research Center in Virginia and Ames Research Center in California, to test the effects of high windspeed, turbulence, icing, ionization, and much more. Some of these facilities were gigantic—the largest, still in operation, is the 80-foot by 120-foot tunnel at NASA's Ames Research Center. In the 1990s, a surplus of government wind tunnels and advances in computer simulations led to a consolidation, and a number of older facilities were demolished. Gathered here, a collection of images of NASA’s amazing wind tunnels from the past century.

The newest phase of Kilauea volcano’s ongoing eruption has opened as many as 20 new fissures on Hawaii's Big Island over the past two weeks, spewing lava and volcanic gases, forcing the evacuation of nearly 2,000 residents, and destroying dozens of homes near the town of Pahoa. Officials from the U.S. Geological Survey have been watching a recent lowering of the lava lake in Kilauea’s Halemaumau crater, warning residents and visitors of a possible explosive eruption that could launch car-sized boulders far into the sky. Here, a collection of images from the past week of the new fissures, the lava flow, and its effects on the natural environment and human infrastructure.

Protests along the Gaza-Israel border were met with tear gas and live fire from Israeli forces, leaving dozens dead and hundreds wounded on Monday. The Palestinian demonstrations marked a confluence of events, including the opening of the new U.S. Embassy in Jerusalem, (moved from Tel Aviv, after President Donald Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel), and the upcoming 70th anniversary of what Palestinians call the nakba, or “catastrophe,” the day thousands were driven from their homes in 1948. Reuters reports, citing the Gaza Health Ministry, that at least 43 Palestinians were killed by Israeli gunfire Monday, “the highest toll in a single day since a series of protests demanding the right to return to ancestral homes in Israel began on March 30.”

What happens when you don’t blame kids for bad behavior? An elementary school in Columbus, Ohio is trying to find out. Katherine Reynolds Lewis writes:

Many of Ohio Avenue’s children have brushed against violence and other traumatic experiences in their short lives—abuse and neglect, a household member addicted to drugs, homelessness, to name a few. At schools like this, a small dispute can easily turn into a scuffle that leads to an administrator or school-safety officer corralling the kids involved, if not suspending them. But Ohio Avenue is trying to find another way: Every adult in the building has received training on how children respond to trauma. They’ve come to understand how trauma can make kids emotionally volatile and prone to misinterpret accidental bumps or offhand remarks as hostile. They’ve learned how to de-escalate conflict, and to interpret misbehavior not as a personal attack or an act of defiance. And they’re perennially looking for new ways to help the kids manage their overwhelming feelings and control their impulses.

The Ohio-based photographer Maddie McGarvey spent a couple days at Ohio Ave recently meeting and spending time with the students, teachers, and administration trying to shift teachers’ perspective on trauma and their relationships with children. “How are [the children] going to learn a positive way of dealing with conflict if we’re not the ones showing it?” asks Olympia Della Flora, the school’s principal. Students at Ohio Ave are provided self-regulation tools like mini-ellipticals, trampolines, and glitter jars, which children can use to...

Retiring police dogs in Ecuador, the Medieval Combat World Championships in Scotland, Victory Day in Russia, a sunset in Paris, a rumbling volcano in Hawaii, the Met Gala in New York, humanoid robots built in England, lost World War II soldiers in Russia, senior ballet in Australia, and much more.

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On May 12, 2008, a magnitude-8.0 earthquake struck beneath a mountainous region in south-central China, toppling buildings and sending landslides crashing into cities, resulting in nearly 70,000 deaths. The 2008 Sichuan earthquake (also called the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake) became even more infamous for exposing the cheap and inferior construction methods used in schools across the region, which left thousands of children dead and injured. Ten years later, in hard-hit Beichuan County, most survivors have been relocated to new homes, which were built about 19 miles (30 kilometers) away from the ruins that remain in place today—slowly being reclaimed by nature.

The volcanic activity in Hawaii today is part of the ongoing Pu’u O’o eruption—the longest-duration eruption ever recorded on Kilauea. The Pu’u O’o eruption has been active, with varying levels of intensity, since January of 1983. Looking back a few decades, Kilauea’s previous record-holder was the spectacular Mauna Ulu eruption, which lasted from May of 1969 until July of 1974, generating amazing lava fountains, cascading lava falls, and eventually adding 230 acres of new land to Hawaii’s Big Island. As we wait to see how these new eruptions will play out, take a moment to view some of Kilauea’s most striking photos from the Mauna Ulu eruption, which ended only 40 years ago.

In Hunan Province, in south central China, sits Zhangjiajie, a large prefecture-level city containing spectacular landforms and parks. These include Tianmen Mountain and the Wulingyuan Scenic Area, which encompasses the Zhangjiajie National Forest Park, Tianzi Mountain Nature Reserve, Yangjiajie Scenic Area, and more. The region is famous for its towering quartzite cliffs, said to have inspired the filmmakers of the 2009 film Avatar.  While Wulingyuan was recognized as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1992, the area has seen recent development to accommodate and attract tourists, including the construction of glass-bottomed walkways and bridges, cable-car systems, and observation elevators. Here, a collection of images of the soaring landscape around Zhangjiajie.

The recent eruptions from several volcanic vents in a residential neighborhood on Hawaii’s Big Island have prompted the evacuation of thousands of residents. The Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory said eight lava fissures had opened under Leilani Estates over the past few days. The opening of the fissures and lava flow from Kilauea Volcano follow a series of earthquakes, including a magnitude-6.9 quake on Friday, and the earlier collapse of a nearby crater, emptying the lake of lava within. The unfolding disaster is unpredictable, and may take a very long time to calm down enough to allow residents to return.

Up close with a sea lion in Vienna, under the cherry blossoms in Stockholm, World Dance Day in Budapest, “Bodies in Urban Spaces” in Vilnius, May Day protests in Puerto Rico, ballet in Central Park, flooding in coastal Kenya, yoga in a Mexican desert,  thousands of guitarists play “Hey Joe” in  Poland, and much more.

The American photographer Lewis Hine is perhaps most famous for his compelling images of child labor across the United States in the early 20th century. In 1918, Hine was hired by the American Red Cross to document their work in Europe, as they provided aid to wounded soldiers and refugees affected by World War I. The photographs were also intended to drum up support for the Red Cross, and appeal to an American audience back home who had grown weary of the war, even as it crawled toward a close. Hine traveled across France, photographing refugee families, orphaned children, wounded and shell-shocked soldiers, the nurses and volunteers who cared for them all, the ruined buildings they fled, and the temporary homes they filled. Take a moment to step back in time 100 years, for a visit to France in the final year of World War I, seen through the lens of Mr. Lewis Hine.

Over the past couple of months, Agence France-Presse photographers have been finding and photographing people who hold job titles that are becoming very rare, such as lamp lighter, street clerk, rickshaw puller, plowman, or elevator attendant. On May Day, these portraits provide a glimpse of a wide array of jobs that are vanishing under the pressures of automation, inexpensive mass production, and other technological and societal changes. Here are photos from workshops, street stalls, farms, cathedrals, darkrooms, and DVD stores, illustrating how technology has ushered in rapid changes to the services and products available worldwide.

Shah Marai, chief photographer for Agence France-Presse in Kabul, was killed today in Afghanistan, one of at least 25 victims of twin suicide bombings in downtown Kabul. The second bombing targeted journalists who had come to cover the initial attack, killing eight of them, including Marai. He began covering events in Afghanistan for AFP in 1998, first as a stringer, later a staff photographer, working his way up to chief photographer. In those 20 years, AFP distributed more than 18,000 of his photos, documenting the war and horror, but also everyday life—including the struggles of ordinary Afghans and the beauty of the landscape. He had an incredible ability to capture the humanity in almost any situation, a collection of his photos is gathered below. Shah Marai leaves behind a family including six children. I also invite you to read “When hope is gone,” written by Marai in 2016 about Afghanistan after the U.S. pulled out, and his own role in covering the events of the previous decades.

A cliffside convenience store in China, a Peruvian sunset, a nesting stork in Belarus, Fashion Week in Brazil, flower fields in California, three lost bear cubs in Bulgaria, fire dancing in the Philippines, Lego art in Paris, a historic handshake in the Korean Demilitarized Zone, and much more.

Today marks the anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. On April 26, 1986, technicians conducting a test inadvertently caused the fourth reactor to explode. Several hundred staff members and firefighters then tackled a blaze that burned for 10 days and sent a plume of radiation around the world in the worst-ever civil nuclear disaster. More than 50 reactor and emergency workers were killed at the time. Authorities evacuated 120,000 people from the area, including 43,000 from the city of Pripyat. Below, recent images from Chernobyl and nearby ghost towns within the exclusion zone, as well as memorials held in Ukraine and Russia.

I’ve been traveling for several days recently, and was unable to compose a proper photo story for today, so I hope you’ll indulge me if I just share a few pictures I took in and around Seattle, Washington, yesterday. The weather was fantastic, and I had the luxury of a whole day to do nothing other than explore the city I once called home, and see how much (and how little) has changed in the dozen years since I left. These are essentially snapshots of the day—I’m still stretching my wings as a photographer, but it’s always fun to keep working on it.

Off the coast of Yemen, in the Arabian Sea, lies isolated Socotra Island, where hundreds of plants and animals have developed into species unique to the island. Socotra is the largest island in an archipelago that includes three other islands. The Socotra Archipelago has been isolated from any large landmass for millions of years, and is now home to a surprising display of biodiversity. Probably the best-known of its endemic flora is the dragon blood tree, with red-colored sap and tightly-clustered branches that look like roots turned upside down. Below, a collection of images of the landscape of Socotra, and the plants and animals that call it home.

On Tuesday, President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump will host the first official state dinner of this administration at the White House, honoring visiting French President Emmanuel Macron. As Mrs. Trump’s team and White House staff work on the final details for the formal event, we present a look back at some state dinners held by past U.S. presidents, from Eisenhower to Obama.