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2018-01-16T15:12:27.580Z
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Facebook is re-tweaking its News Feed again. 

This time it wants to bring it back to friends and family instead of viral videos and media posts, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced in a post Thursday. 

SEE ALSO: Stop reading what Facebook tells you to read

"I'm changing the goal I give our product teams from focusing on helping you find relevant content to helping you have more meaningful social interactions," he wrote.

He said the change should make everyone feel better: "The research shows that when we use social media to connect with people we care about, it can be good for our well-being. We can feel more connected and less lonely, and that correlates with long term measures of happiness and health." Read more...

More about Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, Social Media, News Feed, and Tech

I deleted Facebook's app off my phone more than a month ago. 

And reader: I feel free. 

My days of mindlessly scrolling through random updates from my mom's friends and people I haven't spoken to since high school are over. 

And yours could be too. 

You just have to delete the app. 

That's it. Not your Facebook account. Not your life on the internet. Just the app.

SEE ALSO: The top 10 tech stories of 2017

The initial desire to delete started with Facebook vacuuming up so much space and battery life on my (admittedly old) iPhone 6. But it quickly became clear that my actual, non-battery, capital-L Life was also better off not having Facebook a thumbtap away. Read more...

More about Facebook, Iphone, Mark Zuckerberg, Social Media, and Phones

When travel expert Laura Begley Bloom forgot her laptop on a flight last month, she threw up a tweet in hopes of a small Christmas miracle.

Her prayers were answered

Bloom, who is chief content officer at Family Traveller, saw firsthand the power of social media channels and why travelers are turning to their phone apps like Twitter and Facebook to get in touch with airlines about their travel problems.

Bloom is far from alone, though her success story isn't that common. Airlines (some more than others) continue to wrangle the onslaught of tweets, DMs, and Facebook Messages coming in from frustrated flyers, many who hope their pleas will get noticed.  Read more...

More about Facebook, Twitter, Airlines, Social Media, and Messenger
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Search engine optimization is something we seriously can't seem to get away from — whether we like it or not, it's the new "it" skill that almost every employer looks for.

The only issue? So many of us don't actually know what SEO is. We hear about it all the time, see it in job requirements, and maybe know it has something to do with Google. This SEO for beginners online course can fill you in on almost everything you need to know, and there's no experience required. Read more...

More about Google, Social Media, Search Engine, Seo, and Mashable Shopping

The name Toby Young has been plastered all over Brits' Twitter feeds this week after he was appointed the UK's new universities regulator — a position created by the government to uphold free speech at third level, among other things.

But just days after his appointment, Young deleted a huge chunk of his digital footprint. All in the space of a day. 

SEE ALSO: Trump Twitter notifications have completely ruined my year

We're not talking about the deletion of the odd misjudged tweet posted during one's early adulthood. 54-year-old Young deleted nearly 50 thousand tweets in a day in an effort to erase racist, misogynistic, anti-LGBTQ, and sexually explicit tweets, some of which date back to 2009.   Read more...

More about Twitter, Politics, Uk, Education, and Social Media

Mark Zuckerberg is using 2018 as even further incentive to fix the hot mess that is Facebook.

On Thursday Zuck announced — via Facebook of course — his annual "personal challenge." It's a tradition he started in 2009 in which he kicks off each new year by committing to learning something new.

Over the years, he says, he's visited every state in the U.S., run 365 miles, built an AI for his own house, read 25 books, and even learned Mandarin. But in 2018 the Facebook CEO will work toward fixing important issues on the social media platform. 

Good.

SEE ALSO: Mark Zuckerberg pens a Yom Kippur message asking Facebook for 2016 election forgiveness Read more...More about Conversations, Mark Zuckerberg, Social Media, 2018, and New Year S Resolutions

It's easy to hate on Logan Paul. A 22-year-old YouTuber with 15 million subscribers, Paul made himself the poster child for shallow and gross behavior this weekend by posting a graphic video in which he finds the body of a man who died by suicide in Aokigahara forest, a sacred site at the base of Mt. Fuji. The video gained a million likes before Paul took it down.

Bad enough that Paul yuks it up in the video while dressed in what can only be described as 21st century clown gear, the archetypal ugly American abroad. Worse still was the entirely self-centered apology that came Monday ("This is a first for me, I've never faced criticism like this before"). In a second apology, this time on video, Paul claims to be dejected, yet still had time to coif his hair in its perfect proto-Trump configuration.  Read more...

More about Entertainment, Videos, Youtube, Logan Paul, and Susan Wojcicki

What are your friends liking on Instagram? Whatever it is, it's about to land in your feed.

Instagram is quietly rolling out a new feature that will recommend posts for you based on the activity of the accounts you follow. "Recommended for You" posts will sit in their own section, accessible through a thumbnail above your main feed, according to TechCrunch.

SEE ALSO: Instagram has a cool new feature that only appears after you wait 5 seconds

So, how does Instagram determine which posts will appear in the Recommended for You section? According to Instagram's help section, the posts are suggested according to content liked by the accounts you follow. If you see something you don't like, you can temporarily hide "Recommended for You" posts by tapping the camera icon above the post and selecting "Hide." Read more...

More about Tech, Instagram, Social Media, Web Culture, and Instagram Feed
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Any business owner who wants to be successful — and news flash, that's all of them — needs to have a solid digital marketing strategy in place. We use the internet more than ever, meaning companies have a vast number of ways to reach audiences.

SEE ALSO: Get a comprehensive set of online courses in computer science for 97% off

Savvy digital marketers need to find multiple pathways to engage, connect with, and inevitably sell to a well-informed audience. With the Complete Digital Marketing Course 2017, you'll learn contemporary strategies and techniques to grow a business — whether it's one you own or just your 9-5. Read more...

More about Marketing, Social Media, Quora, Digital Marketing, and Seo

Here's a tale of lost and found that'll restore your faith in humanity. A pub in London rallied to find the owner of a packet of wages that had been left on the premises in the run-up to Christmas. And, much to the relief of the internet, the pub jolly well found him! 

SEE ALSO: This teddy was flown 200 miles to reunite with the little girl who lost him

The Alexandra pub in Wimbledon, south west London, tweeted out a photo of an envelope containing someone named Mariusz's Christmas wages. "Mariusz, we found your pay packet in the Alex on Thursday night," read the tweet. "You haven't lost it, we've got it!"  Read more...

More about Watercooler, Uk, Social Media, Social Media Campaign, and Lost And Found

Instagram loves to secretly test new features on some of its users and get feedback before deciding on whether it should roll them out for everyone.

But over the last few weeks, the company added a new commenting feature that you won't see unless you look at a post for more than five seconds.

SEE ALSO: 12 awesome Instagram features you're probably not using

Before you go ahead and try it, make sure you update the app to the latest version.

Once you've done that, go to your Instagram feed and scroll down to a post. Wait five seconds and you'll should see an "Add a comment..." box appear, like so: Read more...

More about Instagram, Social Media, Comments, Tech, and Social Media Companies

The way we receive content has obviously changed over the last few years, and Cardi B has benefited from it.

Previously, we'd watch TV and read magazines and newspapers to find out what is going on in the world. Today, we have the world in the palm of our hands. That's the consumer's end of the spectrum, but for the producer, it's a different story.

SEE ALSO: CARDI B FOR PRESIDENT

Cardi B is someone whose career has sky rocketed this year thanks to all of that social media consumption. Whether you're a fan or not, you've either heard of her name, seen her face, or have heard her hit song "Bodak Yellow." Read more...

More about Facebook, Twitter, Music, Celebrities, and Instagram

The Swift Life, Taylor Swift's celebrity app created in collaboration with Glu (the same company that brought you Kim Kardashian: Hollywood), is swiftly tanking.

Taylor's game-ified social network for super Swifties started out relatively strong. Like most things The Real Taylor touches, her fans swarmed the App store when it first arrived on her birthday, December 13th. But according to Apptopia, by that Friday the 15th it was already only coming in at #56 on the overall app ranking. By Thursday, December 21st, The Swift Life was flatlining at #793.

This is pretty unheard of for someone with the kind of name recognition and devoted following like Swift. Celebrities with 1/85th of her Twitter following, like Gordon Ramsay, soared above those numbers with his Glu app, garnering over $1 million in revenue by day 53. Read more...

More about Taylor Swift, Kim Kardashian, Social Media, Katy Perry, and App Store

Snap Inc. had a lot to prove in 2017.

Following months of speculation, the company finally went public, as onlookers wondered whether this would be the year the company finally moved out from under Facebook's shadow. That, and so much more, didn't quite go as planned.

SEE ALSO: Why smartphone cameras were the most important tech of 2017

At the close of 2016, I wrote that Evan Spiegel managed to prove not only that his company was worth taking seriously, but that it had the makings of a worthy Facebook competitor. Now, I'm less certain.

To be clear, Snap Inc. is still very much worth taking seriously. The company made a number of important updates that materially change Snapchat for the betterSnap Maps might be the best feature they've ever launched, and the company's shift into augmented reality and artificial intelligence prove it has the technical chops to come up with innovative new features.  Read more...

More about Tech, Snapchat, Social Media, Apps And Software, and Snapchat Discover
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Whether you're sending out a work email or writing a blog post, grammar errors can make you seem unprofessional or, worse, incompetent. Even if you write for a living, like we do, the truth is that mistakes happen. 

Sure, you know the difference between "your" and "you're" as well as "their," "there," and "they're"... right?

SEE ALSO: 5 apps that can turn you into a productivity Jedi

Grammarly Premium is a virtual personal editor that can help clean up your emails, reports, and just about anything else you compose on a computer. Once you download Grammarly, it'll work across services like Gmail, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and practically anywhere else you'd write on the web, without opening up an additional program. The Premium version of the app detects everything from punctuation mistakes and contextual errors, to weak vocabulary and potential plagiarism.  Read more...

More about Facebook, Twitter, Gmail, Social Media, and Typos

Facebook is working to make its platform even more accessible for blind users and people with low vision.

In a series of updates announced Tuesday, the company revealed that it will begin using its already-existing face recognition technology to identify people in photographs for Facebook users with screen readers.

Facebook's director of applied machine learning, Joaquin Candela, wrote in a blog post that the new feature will use face recognition alongside the platform's automatic alt-text tool, which launched in 2016.

SEE ALSO: Facebook's first blind engineer is revolutionizing social media as we know it Read more...More about Tech, Facebook, Conversations, Social Good, and Social Media
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After an October week from hell — when allegations against Harvey Weinstein first began to unravel, Donald Trump threatened to take aid away from Puerto Rico, women boycotted Twitter, and historic wildfires destroyed California — I splurged on a large Blue Raspberry Icee and sat alone in a 12:15 p.m. Saturday showing of Marshall. I turned my phone all the way off, and over the course of the next two hours I ugly cried in the dark. Read more...

More about Conversations, Politics, Health, Social Good, and Mental Health

If there's one thing we should all be able to agree on about The Last Jedi it's most definitely the Porgs

Now, Facebook is helping you relive all the best Porg moments from The Last Jedi and then some, thanks to the social network's new Porg Invasion game. 

SEE ALSO: Everything You Need to Know About Porgs

Playable on Facebook's app and website, as well as Messenger, the adorable — and spoiler-free — game puts you on board the Millennium Falcon as it's quickly being overrun by Porgs. Switch off between BB-8, who must frantically snatch each critter out of the air, and Chewie, who has to fix the destruction the Porgs leave behind. Read more...

More about Tech, Facebook, Star Wars, Social Media, and Apps And Software
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Social media is a great way to reach potential customers and engage an audience. But it can also be insanely complicated. Between Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn, there are too many platforms and not enough time. But there’s a great social media engagement tool that can help you keep everything under control: SMhack

SEE ALSO: Get that side hustle going and learn how to make money off of your blog

SMhack brings all your social media interactions to a single place so you can engage audiences, publish content, analyze results, and track your competitors like a pro. It has important functions like reply, retweet, and DM built in to help streamline your workflow and also lets you schedule posts for later so you don’t have to wake up in the middle of the night to post something crucial. SMhack is also great for collaboration because it lets you add and assign user roles to individual team members. Read more...

More about Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, and Snapchat

Facebook is a symbol of one of the great debates of the 21st century: Is social media a gift to humanity, or is it a curse that drives us further apart and deeper into our own ideological echo chambers? 

There is no simple answer to that question, which is why it frequently becomes a cultural obsession as it did this week, when a recent video surfaced of a former Facebook executive decrying the negative effects of social media. 

SEE ALSO: Facebook responds to criticism that the network is 'destroying how society works'

Now Facebook is joining the conversation with a lengthy blog post about its efforts to understand how the social media platform affects users' well-being. The bottom line is that whether or not social media makes us miserable seems to depend on how we use it, say Facebook's David Ginsberg, director of research, and Moira Burke, a research scientist.  Read more...

More about Tech, Facebook, Social Good, Mark Zuckerberg, and Happiness