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2018-04-24T10:56:03.946Z
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The far out effects of lysergic acid diethylamide, more popularly known as LSD, were discovered on this day in 1943, after a Swiss scientist named Albert Hofmann accidentally ingested a small amount of the drug during the course of his lab work. You may use the comment section on this page to conjure up a “kaleidoscopic play of colors” akin to the one Hofmann reports having experienced, or to pursue other points of off-topic, freewheeling discourse.

Find previous discussions in the Open Thread archive.

Excepting the entreaty that you remain on topic, all of Slate’s usual commenting policies apply.

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In an April 15 Slatest, Jeremy Stahl misspelled the Steele dossier as the Steel dossier.

In an April 13 Sports, Mike Schur misidentified the ocean that’s visible from the Clevelander Hotel. It’s the Atlantic, not the Pacific. It also misidentified J.R. Smith as a point guard. He is a shooting guard.

In an April 12 Slatest, Ben Mathis-Lilley misstated the amount that Karen McDougal was reportedly paid by American Media Inc. in a contract that involved her agreement not to speak publicly about her alleged affair with Donald Trump. It was $150,000, not $130,000.

In an April 11 Politics, Josh Voorhees misstated that a Wisconsin congressional election between Randy Bryce and Paul Nehlen would be the second between a Bernie Sanders–backed Democrat and an avowed anti-Semitic Republican nominee, alluding to an Illinois congressional race. While a different white nationalist won the GOP nomination in Illinois’ 3rd Congressional district, the Sanders-backed challenger there lost to the Democratic incumbent in March.

In an April 10 Industry, Will Oremus misspelled Sen. John Thune’s first name.

In an April 10 Music, Carl Wilson mischaracterized the Ike–and–Tina Turner biopic that Jay-Z and Cardi B reference as a TV movie. What’s Love Got to Do With It was a theatrical release.

In an April 9 Brow Beat, Lena Wilson misidentified A Quiet Place as John Krasinski’s directorial debut. It is his third film as director.

In an April 5 Brow Beat, Lena Wilson misidentified Death Cab for Cutie’s Ben Gibbard as Sam Gibbard.

In a March 28 Politics, Osita Nwanevu misstated that Kevin Williamson has argued...

The earliest known audio recording was produced on this day in 1860 on a phonautograph invented by Édouard-Léon Scott de Martinville. You may use the comment thread on this page to appraise this vintage rendition of “Au Clair de la Lune,” which can be heard here, or to pursue other points of off-topic, freewheeling discourse.

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In an April 6 Slatest, Ben Mathis-Lilley misspelled RNC Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel’s first name.

In an April 5 Future Tense, Aaron Mak misstated that the Lifeline program allowed eligible people to get internet for $9.25 per month. The program allows them to get a discount of $9.25 per month off their bill.

In an April 5 Brow Beat, Lena Wilson misspelled Karen Han’s last name.

In an April 5 Brow Beat, Joshua Keating misstated that Black Panther will be the first movie shown in Saudi Arabia since a ban on public movie screenings was lifted. It will be the first shown in a permanent movie theater. Screenings have been held since January in temporary locations.

In an April 4 Future Tense, Stephanie Tam misspelled professor Kartik Hosanagar’s last name.

In an April 3 Family, Rachelle Hampton mischaracterized the date a viral photo of Devonte Hart and Bret Barnum was taken. It was Nov. 25, 2014.

In an April 2 Good Fight, Yascha Mounk misidentified Jeff Bezos as the owner of Amazon. He is the CEO of Amazon, a publicly traded company.

In an April 2 Jurisprudence, Jed Shugerman misstated that a key drafter at the Philadelphia Convention, referring to Gouverneur Morris, cited the secret Treaty of Dover episode to explain the Emoluments Clause. He discussed it at the convention, but he did not cite it to explain emoluments.

Slate strives to correct all errors of fact. If you’ve seen an error in our pages, let us know at corrections@slate.com. General comments should be posted in our Comments sections...

Oh, dear! On this day in 2018, Slate’s Open Thread was posted late. You may use the comment thread on this page to ruthlessly eviscerate those responsible for this error, or to graciously accept their apology, or to wonder if it was a strangely off-key April Fools’ joke, or to pursue other points of off-topic, freewheeling discourse.

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In a March 30 Brow Beat, Lena Wilson misstated Robin Byrd’s age. She’s 37, not 39.

In a March 30 Slatest, Ben Mathis-Lilley misstated that Dr. Bennet Omalu had speculated about the condition of Hillary Clinton’s brain. Omalu suggested that Clinton’s blood may have borne signs of poisoning.

Due to a production error a March 29 El Gabfest en Español show page misstated the third host of the episode. It’s Fernando Pizarro, not Ariel Moutsatsos.

In a March 28 Future Tense, Alex Barasch misstated the number of countries and territories where Grindr is used. It is 234, not 232. Barasch also misspelled Trever Faden’s first name, and misstated that Grindr transmitted users’ location data unencrypted. According to Grindr, all geohash information is encrypted.

In a March 28 Industry, Jaime Dunaway misidentified the number of times the #DeleteFacebook hashtag was mentioned on March 20. It was used more than 40,000 times, not more than 40 million times.

In a March 28 Future Tense, Aaron Mak misstated that Tim Cook’s interview with Recode and MSNBC would air this Friday. It is scheduled to air on April 6.

In a March 28 Slatest, Josh Voorhees misidentified director J.J. Abrams’ wife, Katie McGrath, as an actress; she works in public relations. Voorhees also misstated Missouri Senate candidate Josh Hawley’s age. He is now 38, not 37.

In a March 28 Slatest, Ben Mathis-Lilley misstated that the family of Kirsten Gillibrand’s father, Doug Rutnik, had been influential in New York for many generations. Rutnik married into a...

Monday is the etymological anniversary of the word gerrymander, a portmanteau of Gerry and salamander that made its earliest known appearance on this day in 1812, in a Boston Gazette political cartoon entitled “The Gerry-mander: a New Species of Monster.” You may use the comment section on this page to discuss the political legacy of Elbridge Gerry, or to pursue other points of freewheeling, off-topic discussion.

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In a March 24 Politics, Dahlia Lithwick misstated the length of the silence during Emma González’s speech at the March for Our Lives. She stayed silent for 4 minutes and 25 seconds, not 6 minutes.

In a March 23 Brow Beat, Lena Wilson misspelled Christiane Amanpour’s first name.

n a March 23 Slatest, Josh Voorhees misstated that the DCCC “made it clear” it believes Texas congressional candidate Laura Moser is too far left to win in a general election. The group says its decision to attack her had nothing to do with ideology.

Due to a production error, a photo caption in a March 22 Brow Beat misidentified Michael Hyatt of Crazy Ex-Girlfriend as Lorraine Toussaint. Aisha Harris misidentified Martin Sheen as Michael Sheen.

In a March 22 Life, Benjamin Frisch misspelled Seth Meyers’ last name.

In a March 21 Brow Beat, Lena Wilson misstated that Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood addressed the assassination of John F. Kennedy. The show covered the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy.

In a March 21 Future Tense, Henry Grabar misidentified the supervising driver in a fatal autonomous Uber crash as a man. She is a woman.

In a March 21 Moneybox, Jordan Weissmann misidentified Bloomberg Law reporter Ben Penn as Ben Parr.

In a March 21 Science, Geoff Fox misspelled Laina Rusk’s first name and misidentified Nick Russo as being in Lansing, Michigan, when he is based in Flint.

In a March 20 Work, Alieza Durana misspelled researcher Jonathan Morduch’s last name.

A March 19 Metropolis incorrectly identified the FIU-Sweetwater UniversityCity Bridge...

Several million Brits were left without BBC service after the sudden collapse of the Emley Moor transmitting tower on this day in 1969. You may use the comment section on this page to discuss this and other structural failures, or to pursue other points of freewheeling, off-topic discussion.

Find previous discussions in the Open Thread archive.

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In a March 15 Jurisprudence, Jeremy Stahl mischaracterized comments made by Seth Abramson and other political commentators regarding Stormy Daniels’ contract with Donald Trump. These comments suggested her contract is unlikely to be enforced, not that it is unenforceable.

In a March 15 Politics, Christina Cauterucci misstated that Tim Kaine, as Virginia governor, supported an informed consent law that included a mandatory intravaginal ultrasound. The ultrasound provision was added to the law after Kaine left office.

In a March 14 Books, Laura Miller misstated that Paul Haynes is an amateur expert on the Golden State Killer crimes. Haynes was Michelle McNamara’s lead researcher on the book I’ll Be Gone in the Dark, a paid position.

In a March 14 Future Tense, a photo caption misidentified a village in Nepal as Chheplung. It is Ghat.

In a March 14 Slatest, Molly Olmstead misstated that Deborah Wesson Gibson came forward about her relationship with Moore in December. She first spoke out in November. Additionally, Olmstead misstated Moore’s age at the time of their relationship. He was 34, not 32.

In a March 13 Brow Beat, Lena Wilson misspelled Fanshen Cox DiGiovanni’s last name.

In a March 13 Future Tense, Aaron Mak misstated the day the air taxi service Cora was unveiled. It was Monday, not Tuesday.

In a March 13 Life, Rachelle Hampton misspelled Jeet Heer’s name.

In a March 13 and a March 15 Slatest, Ben Mathis-Lilley identified Gina Haspel, who has been nominated to be director of the CIA, as having supervised the torture of a...

Ever since Slate launched 22 years ago, our writers have been dedicated to highlighting an issue that’s central to our democracy and our self-conception as Americans: the principle of one person, one vote.

Our coverage of voting rights has been consistently sharp, informed, and vital. Mark Joseph Stern has tracked the Supreme Court’s progress on gerrymandering and provided analysis you won’t find anywhere else. Dahlia Lithwick has probed the ugly history, and the consequences, of voter ID requirements. Jeremy Stahl has investigated the suspicious destruction of data from Georgia’s vulnerable election system. And Jamelle Bouie has made the case for a constitutional amendment establishing the right to vote.

We’ve written about the ongoing need for the Voting Rights Act and its death at the hands of Chief Justice John Roberts. We’ve explored how voter ID laws discriminate against women, how the concept of “voter fraud” makes no sense, and how the right tries to rationalize voter suppression. We’ve examined the mysterious disappearance of an “electoral integrity” group, explained the danger posed by our decrepit election infrastructure, and even turned the country’s most egregious congressional gerrymanders into an interactive jigsaw puzzle.

With the 2018 midterms approaching, we want to do more. That’s why we’re asking you to help us expand our coverage of gerrymandering, disenfranchisement, voter suppression, and other threats to democracy.

Thousands of Slate readers have already joined Slate Plus to help support our journalism, and we couldn’t be more grateful. If you haven’t joined yet—or you’re a Plus member who wants to...

In a March 4 Brow Beat, Matthew Dessem omitted the award for Animated Feature Film from a list of the order the Academy Awards would be presented.

In a March 2 Moneybox, Henry Grabar misspelled Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross’ first name.

In a March 1 Metropolis, Henry Grabar misstated that the Hyperloop One test pod was made of steel. It was made of carbon fiber and aluminum.

In a March 1 Television, Willa Paskin misstated that a crocodile appears in an early episode in Season 2 of Atlanta. It’s an alligator.

In a March 1 War Stories, Fred Kaplan misstated that a line from Three Days of the Condor was spoken by a character played by John Gielgud. It was John Houseman.

In a Feb. 28 Slatest, Elliot Hannon misstated that Dick’s Sporting Goods sold the gun used in the Parkland shooting. The company sold a gun to the shooter, Nikolas Cruz, but it was not the one used in the school shooting.

In a Feb. 28 Better Life Lab, Alieza Durana and Haley Swenson misstated that nine OECD countries offer additional paid leave to single parents. Five OECD countries do.

In a Feb. 28 Science, Daniel Engber misstated that Brian Wansink and Koert van Ittersum launched a new science journal on their own. They were guest editors for its inaugural issue.

In a Feb. 28 Slatest, Henry Grabar misspelled HUD spokesman Raffi Williams’ first name. Grabar also misstated that Ben Carson’s office spent $35,000 on furniture. The amount spent was $31,561.

In a...

It was during this week one year ago that this community inaugurated Slate’s first Open Thread, here, to mark the 450th anniversary of the Battle of Oosterwheel. A lengthy conversation ensued, and its participants decided to meet weekly thenceforth, to observe the passing of time in freewheeling discourse about such sundry topics as may otherwise escape the attention of this site’s readers. You may use the comment thread on this page to applaud your fellow commenters, who, in sum, now regularly expend more than 50,000 Livefyre units in each week’s forum, or to pursue other points of off-topic discussion.

Thanks to Carlton Fisk for suggesting this week’s topic. Find previous discussions in the Open Thread archive.

Excepting the entreaty that you remain on topic, all of Slate’s usual commenting policies apply.

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In a March 9 Slatest, Ben Mathis-Lilley misstated the publication date of Bret Stephens’ New York Times opinion piece on Venezuela. The piece was published on Feb. 15, not Feb. 18.

In a March 8 Slatest, Elliot Hannon misstated that Ben Carson’s $31,000 dining set was for his home. It was part of a renovation for his HUD office suite.

Due to a photo provider error, a photo illustration on a March 8 Slatest incorrectly highlighted Taiwan as part of China. Taiwan is recognized as a separate country.

In a March 6 Medical Examiner, Amy Mackinnon misidentified Julia Greenstein as Julie Greenstein and misstated her title. She’s the vice president of research strategy, not of discovery research.

In a March 6 Outward, Evan Urquhart misstated that drag, as an art form, was created by and for transgender women.

Slate strives to correct all errors of fact. If you’ve seen an error in our pages, let us know at corrections@slate.com. General comments should be posted in our Comments sections at the bottom of each article.

The ZX81, a pioneering personal computer made by Sinclair Research, went on sale on this day in 1981. You may use the comment thread on this page to recall your earliest computer hardware purchases, or to pursue other points of off-topic, freewheeling discourse.

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Excepting the entreaty that you remain on topic, all of Slate’s usual commenting policies apply.

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It was on this day in 1909, at a film screening at the Palace Theatre in London, that Kinemacolor, the first successful process for adding color to motion pictures, was first shown to a public audience. You may use the comment thread on this page to celebrate the history of color film or to pursue other points of off-topic, freewheeling discourse.

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Huaynaputina, a stratovolcano located in present-day Peru, exploded catastrophically on this day in 1600. You may use the comment thread on this page to talk about how the resultant volcanic winter precipitated the Russian famine of 1601 or to pursue other points of off-topic, freewheeling discourse.

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In a Feb. 22 Politics, Christina Cauterucci misstated when the Orlando Pulse nightclub shooting happened. It was in the summer of 2016, not 2017.

In a Feb. 22 Slatest, Ben Mathis-Lilley misspelled Marjory Stoneman Douglas’ first name.

In a Feb. 21 Brow Beat, Matthew Dessem misspelled commentator Jesse Watters’ last name.

Due to an editing error, a Feb. 21 Future Tense misstated the date when the Federal Communications Commission published the repeal of net neutrality rules. It was Thursday, not Tuesday.

In a Feb. 21 Moneybox, Henry Grabar misidentified the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

In a Feb. 20 Interrogation, Isaac Chotiner misidentified Steven Pinker’s book The Better Angels of Our Nature as The Better Angles of Our Nature.

In a Feb. 20 Slatest, Josh Voorhees misstated that Sean Duffy and his wife, Rachel, were castmates on Real World: Boston. They met as participants on Road Rules: All Stars.

In a Feb. 19 Slatest, Lila Thulin misidentified Philadelphia as Pennsylvania’s capital. The state’s capital is Harrisburg.

Slate strives to correct all errors of fact. If you’ve seen an error in our pages, let us know at corrections@slate.com. General comments should be posted in our Comments sections at the bottom of each article.

In a Feb. 17 Five-Ring Circus, Josh Levin misstated the dates of the Winter Olympics’ freestyle skiing qualification round and finals. Both events were scheduled for Sunday, Feb. 18 in Korea and due to the time difference were broadcast on Saturday Feb. 17 in the United States.

In a Feb. 16 Better Life Lab, Devin Fergus misstated that law firms, rather than lending firms, could charge annual or monthly rates.

In a Feb. 16 Future Tense, April Glaser misstated the name of the Tow Center for Digital Journalism.

In a Feb. 16 Slatest, Jeremy Stahl misidentified the Federal Election Commission as the Federal Election Committee.

In a Feb. 14 Slatest, Jeremy Stahl misstated that the Columbine mass shooting occurred in 1998. It happened in 1999.

In a Feb. 14 Slatest, Jeremy Stahl misidentified the Miami Herald as the Miami Herald Tribune and Treasure Coast Newspapers as the Treasure Coast Palm Beach Post.

In a Feb. 13 Work, Zuzana Boehmová misstated that workplaces are supposed to give women the ability to pump at work. The Fair Labor Standards Act only requires this accommodation for hourly workers. Boehmová also misstated that children were transported by train in 18th-century France. It was the 19th century.

In a Feb. 12 Metropolis, Henry Grabar misidentified the piece of the electric bicycle beneath the seat. It is a computer, not a motor. The article also mischaracterized the company’s offer. The $150 per month payment is a financing option, not a lease.

In a Feb. 12 Moneybox, Henry Grabar...

A massive iron meteorite fell to earth in a mountain range in southeastern Russia on this day in 1947, one of the largest impact events observed during the 20th century. You may use the comment thread on this page to discuss the Sikhote-Alin meteorite or to pursue other points of off-topic, freewheeling discourse.

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