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2018-07-20T00:28:19.370Z
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{"feed":"Pitchfork-Album-Reviews","feedTitle":"Pitchfork Album Reviews","feedLink":"/feed/Pitchfork-Album-Reviews","catTitle":"Music","catLink":"/cat/music"}
Post-breakout solo releases are supposed to be this-is-my-time proclamations, but the SOB x RBE member’s project feels engineered to bring out his pathos.
Carissa’s Wierd alum Jennifer Hays makes her first foray into crowd-pleasing synth pop in an intriguing collaboration with Seattle-based producer SYML.
Decades after its release, the industrial innovators’ newly reissued masterpiece sounds as terrifying as ever—and claims its place in history as a bridge between generations of avant-garde art.
It’s possible that nobody needs another 303 workout, but the Italian producer’s latest album proves that a programmer of his caliber can still wring some ecstasy from the machine.
A compilation from Nina Kraviz’ трип label connects the dots between leftfield techno, acid, and breakneck hardcore, forging an adventurous style evocative of warehouse raves in deepest Siberia.
At turns explosive and intimate, the three-hour-plus show performed at a small club in West Hollywood is a legendary document of how Bruce and the E Street Band could transform their songs on stage.
On their third record, the indie-folk duo celebrate choices but settle on none.
On her debut album as Cruel Diagonals, the Oakland experimental musician Megan Mitchell turns samples sourced from ethnomusicological archives into ambient music that’s both expressive and empathetic.
On her first new release in almost 20 years, Japanese composer Midori Takada joins NYC’s Egyptian-Iranian singer Lafawndah on a short but fascinating multimedia project with mythical overtones.
Laurel Halo’s most ambient—and most linear—record to date swims in mysterious electro-acoustic textures; it marks a departure from her usual mode of thorny, cerebral electronic composition.
Taiwanese artist Pon blends traditional mythology and instruments with electronic beats and cacophonous samples on a release inspired by life in—and the urge to escape from—her home city of Taipei.
The alt-R&B duo’s second album remains preoccupied with breakups, but these stories of separation and loss are rendered so dispassionately, it’s hard to feel invested in their outcomes.
The debut from the Berlin-based producer explores at the idea of power in the world and within themself, tiptoeing the line between exuberance and terror.
Dave Longstreth is on a madcap quest for personal and political salvation on his latest album, reviving a more hopeful, chipper kind of songwriting of his past.
Singer Rosita Bonita and producer Prinz George prove R&B can still be crazy, sexy, cool on a mixtape that favors the uptempo ’90s grooves of Timbaland, New Edition, and especially TLC.
Evolving from the lo-fi sound of his home recordings, the New York singer-songwriter significantly steps up his studio chops, but his songs’ emotional register often remains frustratingly oblique.
Each Sunday, Pitchfork takes an in-depth look at a significant album from the past, and any record not in our archives is eligible. Today we explore the rise of Cash Money on Juvenile’s 1998 classic 400 Degreez.
The mostly solid debut album from the South African producer Okzharp and vocalist Manthe Ribane foregoes their earlier sound for something slower and more ponderous.
DJ Seinfeld’s entry to the long-running mix series is a competent mix of ambient and deep house for the fledgling selector.
Philadelphia singer-songwriter Rosali Middleman constructs verdant, contemplative rock songs whose soft exteriors conceal a steely core of cool observations about heartache and vulnerability.