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2018-05-22T13:49:35.520Z
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In the soils of the world's cereal fields, a family tussle between related species of fungi is underway for control of the crops' roots, with food security on the line. Beneficial fungi can help plants to protect themselves from cousins eager to overwhelm the roots, but it's a closely fought battle. Working out the right conditions to support those beneficial fungi and identifying the cereal varieties that are best suited to make the most of that help is no mean task.
Women who are unable to quit smoking during their pregnancy may reduce the harm smoking does to their baby's lungs by taking vitamin C, according to a new randomized, controlled trial.
The researchers who published an article three years ago about the presence of previously undiscovered forms of formaldehyde in e-cigarette vapor revisited their research and found that formaldehyde risks were even higher than they originally thought.
Each time a blood vessel splits into smaller vessels, red blood cells (RBCs) are presented with the same decision: Take the left capillary or the right. While one might think RBCs would divide evenly at every fork in the road, it is known that at some junctures, RBCs seem to prefer one vessel over the other. One new computer model looks to determine why RBCs behave this way, untangling one of the biggest mysteries in our vascular system.
A new study looks at the link between maternal sleep and permissive parenting during late adolescence. Findings show that mothers who don't get enough sleep or who take longer falling asleep have a greater tendency to engage in permissive parenting -- parenting marked by lax or inconsistent discipline.
A collaborative research team has uncovered new information that more accurately explains how cancerous tumors grow within the body. This study is currently available in Nature Genetics.
The mechanisms by which ADT may lead to an increased risk of sudden death were unclear.
A molecular study carried out on the chestnut gall wasp, Dryocosmus kuriphilus, has revealed the absence of genetic variability in this invasive species, a chestnut-tree parasite, in Europe. This is due to the fact that the wasp's reproduction is strictly parthenogenetic, the females produce more females without having to be fertilized by a male. The high capacity of reproduction of the females, producing genetically identical daughters, give this insect a high invasive potential.
Scientists have identified the cell types underlying schizophrenia. The findings offer a roadmap for the development of new therapies to target the condition.
Researchers created a technology that could lead to new devices for faster, more reliable ultra-broad bandwidth transfers. For the first time, researchers demonstrated how electrical fields boost the non-linear optical effects of graphene.
Risk factors for heart disease and stroke appear to hasten the risk of cognitive decline in normal older individuals with evidence of very early Alzheimer's-disease-associated changes in the brain.
A new study found that the annual economic impact of child sexual abuse in the US is far-reaching and costly: In 2015, the total economic burden was approximately $9.3 billion and includes costs associated with health care, child welfare, special education, violence and crime, suicide and survivor productivity losses.
Fetal magnetic resonance imaging can reliably spot holoprosencephaly as early as 18 gestational weeks, providing an opportunity to counsel families earlier in their pregnancy, according to new research.
A new study shows that stereotactic body radiation (SBRT) may be better against anaplastic thyroid cancer, and with fewer side effects.
Researchers have developed new technologies that can be used to convert industrial plants to produce fossil-free heat, electricity, fuel, chemicals and materials. The technical potential is enormous -- using only Sweden's currently existing power plants, renewable fuels equivalent to 10 percent of the world's aviation fuel could be produced.
Patients who receive an opioid for most of their hospital stay and patients who are still taking an opioid within 12 hours of being discharged from the hospital appear more likely to fill a prescription for opioids within 90 days of leaving the hospital, according to new research.
Researchers have measured the human pupil upon gaining insight into an object. It is known that pupils dilate/narrow to adjust the amount of light entering the eye and that emotional state affects the extent of dilation/narrowing. This study indicates that dilation extent varies depending on if inspiration occurs and that dilation occurs before inspiration.
The hotter our body temperature, the more our bodies speed up a key defense system that fights against tumors, wounds or infections, new research has found.
Macrophages are white blood cells that perform different functions with different energy needs. M2-type macrophages have anti-inflammatory properties that may protect against inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the molecular pathways driving M2 formation are not fully understood. Researchers identified a protein commonly involved in nervous system development that plays a key role in metabolism of M2 macrophages and protecting against colitis symptoms in mice. The findings may lead to new therapeutic targets for inflammatory diseases.
Scientists have developed a specially adapted 3D printer to build therapeutic biomaterials from multiple materials. The advance could be a step toward on-demand printing of complex artificial tissues for use in transplants and other surgeries.