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2018-01-18T07:55:10.452Z
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What does Rembrandt have to do with IKEA? Nothing much except a photographer in Norway somehow managed to put them together in a surprising Rembrandt photo shoot.

A camera store, Stavanger Foto commissioned Stig Håvard Dirdal to create a Christmas greeting card. Given complete reins over the creative direction, Dirdal looked to the Old Masters, Rembrandt’s The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp as a starting point.

“My base idea was to make something interesting and relevant for the camera store business while adding an element of surprise in the form of a retrospective perspective,” he writes in a post on PetaPixel. “Transforming an anatomy lesson into a Christmas present wrapping study just rang my bells.”

But what about the period pieces? Dirdal took a leaf from HBO’s Games of Thrones costume design department and went shopping at IKEA. He admits that “IKEA—they have ‘everything’ — and it is good value for the money,” he says in an interview with The Modern Met. And like the former, he met with resounding success.

Here’s his shopping list for the Rembrandt photo shoot

We built an IKEA kitchen corner base cabinet to accommodate a regular corner sink instead of that horrible “bat-wing” sink they sell.

Our tiny kitchen using the IKEA corner sink hack came out beautiful with our 24 inch wide appliances. (Dishwasher is 18 inch). My sink is deep, I can set my stock pot in and with it being an under-mount, I easily wipe crumbs off the counter. My drawers light up too!

I thought folks would appreciate having some step-by-step instructions on how to create a normal corner sink install using IKEA cabinetry. We LOVE ours!

IKEA item used: 

  • Corner base cabinet for sink
Photo: IKEA.com

When on the IKEA page (linked here), scroll down and click on the “Assembly Instructions” link to download the instruction manual PDF file, or refer to the manual that comes with the product. Each step in the hack instructions pdf corresponds with each step in the original document, but with the appropriate modifications for the hack.

Download the hack instructions pdf here.

The hack instructions pdf lays down the step-by-step to convert the corner base cabinet for sink which looks like this:

I moved into a new house with a huge open closet room with no storage. I designed my entire walk-in gorgeous closet using the PAX system, but now have realized my ceiling is too low. The ceiling is 78 1/4” tall.

Can the PAX system be cut down? Would you cut the bottom or the top?
I’ve searched the site and not found an alternative product.

~ by Ally

***

Hi Ally

The shorter PAX stands at 79 1/4″, just an inch taller than your ceiling. Oh bummer. Good news is … yes, you can shorten PAX wardrobes.

Dave cut down the PAX to create a bespoke loft wardrobe.


Here’s another one. The PAX cut into a craft and sewing cabinet to fit an awkward space.

Now that its “cut-ability” is established, you need to know that the PAX is particleboard, so getting a good clean cut can be tricky. There are lots of good information on how to cut particleboard on the internet, like this one here, so I’ll not go into the how’s.

One thing to remember, you’ll need enough room height to accommodate the diagonal dimension of the wardrobe and not merely the height (79 1/4″), otherwise after you assemble it flat on the floor, you won’t have enough clearance to stand it up!

Those of us who don’t speak Swedish or Danish are clearly at a disadvantage when it comes to IKEA. Sure, like any diehard fan I can rattle off a few dozen IKEA names. But what do they mean? And how do you pronounce the A balancing a little circle on it’s head and, and, and what about the horrified O (Ö)?

On my last trip to IKEA, my Swedish host pointed out it’s BEST-TOE and not Best-TA, when I was excitedly telling her of a BESTÅ hack.

Well, I still can’t say the IKEA names right (or make puns about them like this guy) but I’ll know what they mean. Thanks for an IKEA Dictionary by Lars Petrus. He categorises the names into 4 main groups and 1 for mystery names he hasn’t figured out yet.

IKEA names fall under these 4 main groups:
  • Proper Swedish words
  • Made-up Swedish words
  • First names (mostly Swedish, some Scandinavian, occasional exotic names)
  • Geographical names (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian or Finnish.)

Here’s a screen shot of the IKEA names dictionary. Geek out, alright.

Scrolling through the dictionary, I found out that the oft-mispronounced BESTÅ is a Swedish word which means “remain” or “consist of”. Nice!

I love my kids art and paintings. I love to keep the good ones and show them. This kids art display box allows me to save the paintings, show them, easily change the piece on display and, in general, give them the right attention.

The idea of the kids art display box itself is not mine. I already had two boxes like this made of wood I bought for my elder daughters many years ago. So, I wanted to add two more boxes but could not find it anywhere.

Since I was looking for these boxes for a long time, it was so fun to find out how easy and cheap it was to make them myself.

The box keeps the paintings (A4 gets in easily) and the first painting stands nicely in the frame thanks to the backer board.

The project itself takes about 10min.

It costs $11.5 ($8.99 + $2.49)

IKEA items used:

  • Hejsan Box set of 3 (using only the big box)
  • Fiskbo Frame 8.5×11′
HEJSAN | Photo: IKEA.com FISKBO | Photo: IKEA.com

Other materials and tools:

At the start of the year, you’ve probably taken a look at your home and thought, “I need new lighting” or “We should figure out something for that awkward nook” or simply, “My craft room is a mess/ needs storage”. Well, let 2018 be the year to tackle some of these “someday” projects.

Here are 12 IKEA hacks to try this year, one for each month. I hope they’ll start firing some neurons in your right brain.

12 IKEA Hacks to Try in 2018 #1 Upgrade a lamp shade

The right lamp shade can lift the style of the place immediately. If you have a plain IKEA lamp shade and want a change of style, how about wrapping the shade in yarn? Or with maps?

DesignLoveFest #2 Add a sideboard

You know, that blank wall that just “needs something”? Well, this is the thing. A sideboard with all the right Scandinavian vibes.

#3 Get your home office in working order

You’ve always dreamed of a better, more functional home office? Make it happen with IKEA countertops and drawer units. This dual workstation is totally doable, even for first time hackers.

We needed storage for our new family room (playroom/home office) but didn’t want to go down the bright colours route plus I couldn’t afford the cost of a new carpet. And the bright colours from IKEA really wouldn’t go with my current color scheme!

IKEA items used:

  • 2x IKEA TROFAST step units 100.914.53 and boxes

Other materials and tools:

Note: Ignore steps 1 & 2 if putting fabric on all boxes

Instructions for the children’s storage boxes

1. Clean boxes with sugar soap to remove grease if not brand new.

2. Spray one layer of paint. Leave to dry as directed on spray paint. Spray inside. When dry, spray second coat.

3. For the plain white boxes that you want to fabric wrap; measure out a template using the interfacing, mark the position of the notches but don’t cut out these yet.


Need a place for your kid to build his LEGO pieces? This DIY Lego play table with drawer storage is the perfect solution! It’s so easy to make and affordable too. It uses the IKEA LACK side tables and TROFAST bins. A cheap and easy project anyone can make.

IKEA items used:

  • 3 LACK side tables
  • 3 TROFAST bins
  • Plastic drawer guides
Photo: IKEA.com

 

Other materials and tools:


We have 80+ IKEA & LEGO hacks. Click to see them all.


Attach adhesive tape to TROFAST drawer guides and press to underside of LACK table.

Insert TROFAST drawer between guides.

Glue base plates to LACK top. Use LEGO bricks to get the right spacing between plates.

Connect multiple LACK tables together with adhesive Velcro strips.

See full tutorial of the LEGO play table with drawer storage on The Handyman’s Daughter.

~ by Vineta @ The Handyman’s Daughter


You may like these LEGO play tables too

LEGO DUPLO storage and play table

Henk made this as a birthday present for his...

I have a Hemnes bed, the old model which had a footboard as you can see in the photo. However my feet are always hitting the bottom because the HEMNES footboard is too high.

I don’t want to buy a new mattress but was thinking of replacing the footboard with the one from MALM, which is lower, so my feet would not hit up on it.

The footboard height on the HEMNES is 26 inches, where as on the MALM it is only 15 inches.

Photo: IKEA.com

Has anyone tried this?

Is it structurally safe?

Can I buy just the MALM footboard from Ikea?

Thanks everyone.

~ by Mary

***

Hi Mary

Sorry to hear the HEMNES footboard is giving you less than cozy nights. 

First off, I doubt that you can buy a MALM footboard without the rest of the frame. I’m not 100% sure but I doubt that it can be sold separately. You may be able to score a cheap second hand MALM off eBay or Craigslist. 

I’ve not seen anyone hack a MALM footboard for a HEMNES bed, so I can’t comment on piecing both pieces together. Anyone...

I made a roll-top backpack for my partner as a Christmas present because he bikes a lot and in case he gets caught in the rain this will definitely repel anything Mother Nature throws at him. I’m very happy with how this bag came out and I hope you guys love it as much as I do!!!

IKEA Items Used:

  • IKEA FRAKTA Blue Bags

Other Items Used:

I followed the “Range” backpack pattern from Noodlehead Designs.


Check out this Ultralight Backpack, also made from FRAKTA bags.


I cut the shopping bags into panels at the seams to utilize the full amount of fabric from each bag. Then I assembled the front panel with the zipper. Following I attached the sides. All the while trying to incorporate as many of the original Ikea bag straps to each panel.

Happy 2018! I’m looking forward to all (including all the amazing hacks) that 2018 will bring. What about you? Let me start by wishing you all things bright and beautiful for your home and life.

Before we get into the thick of 2018, let’s recap 2017. In a nutshell, in 2017 we had fewer “hardcore” hacks, if you know what I mean. Less deconstruction and turning it into something totally out of the world. More painting and makeovers, restyles and upgrades. Which I think is what the IKEA hacking movement as a whole (not just on IH) is going through at the moment. Nonetheless, it’s always good to see people putting their touch on IKEA and making it their own. That part never gets old.

So without further ado, here’s my list of the top 10 IKEA hacks of 2017, in no particular order. I hope you like them too. If I missed out your favourites, let me know in the comments.

IKEAhackers’ Top 10 IKEA Hacks of 2017 #1 These cats got it good

Calling it a litter box would be an insult to this almost palatial cat comfort room. Don and Michele poured their heart into hacking this comfort station their cats would love to go to. See more of the cat comfort station.

#2 Multi functional room divider

Eutropia Architettura designed a hardworking room divider for their client. It’s made out of STUVA cabinets and...

IKEA items used:

  • SILVERÅN vanity

Other materials used:

  • Primer and paint
  • Tapered legs from Osborne Wood Products
  • Liquid Nails construction glue
  • Screws
  • Threaded furniture glide feet
  • Tolson cabinet knobs from Rejuvenation

Here’s how I customized an IKEA vanity, the SILVERÅN, for our newly-remodeled half-bathroom. Because this powder room is in a visible spot on our bungalow’s first floor, I wanted a vanity that looked like a piece of furniture we’d have elsewhere in the house.

I was unable to find an off-the-shelf vanity that fit both my taste and the small space. I got quotes from a variety of places for a simple custom vanity, all of which came in around $1k (for the cabinet only – sink not included). I didn’t want to spend that kind of money on such a small piece and decided to take my chances on an IKEA hack. It’s pretty simple: paint, legs, and hardware.

There are two IKEA SILVERÅN cabinet finishes: white and light brown. The white one is made up of particleboard and plastic. It’s $20 less expensive, but it feels and looks even cheaper. The light brown one is solid pine. I chose this one because it felt sturdier and would be easier to customize. I bought it when IKEA had a 20% off sale on bathroom products, which...

My name is Gille Monte Ruici, I make sculptures, and particularly bots, starting from recycled matter and of waste.

Few months ago I already sent you two hacks. (See them here and here).

Here is a new one, called : KROBY the snake lamp.

To do this I used a KROBY light fixture.

Photo: IKEA.com

Originally, I had the standard model. I wanted to customize the luminaire to match the spirit of the room, where it is now installed.

I kept the structure, which I completed with metal washbasin siphons. These twists thus represent the body of a snake.

At each end, I dressed the lamps with grid lamp shades. Finally I fixed barbecue hooks reminiscent of the mouth of the snake with its venomous hook. The set gives a very airy and unique support!

This is a bike ledge made out of IKEA MOSSLANDA picture ledges and a few other materials you may already have at home. All done pretty quickly and easily. And the bikes are neatly stowed away, off the floor.

Materials:

  • 1 MOSSLANDA Picture ledge, 155 cm white Art nr: 402.917.66
  • 1 MOSSLANDA Picture ledge, 55 cm white Art.nr: 902.921.03
Photo: IKEA.com

  • 1 Nylon cable strap

Tools:

Steps to making a bike ledge

Mount the ledges, according to instructions by IKEA.

Use a level to check that your ledges are positioned in a straight line.

Place the screw-eye so the cable strap reaches the top of the seat stay.

(Depending on they type of wall, you may need to use appropriate wall...

We hacked the ANTILOP high chair into a low chair. It’s now at a suitable level for feeding and play in the lounge. It takes up less room too.

IKEA item used:

Here’s how to make a low chair

Knock out the feet from the legs, cut the bottom of the legs at the desired height, refit the feet.

Stability seems unaffected.

Newspaper as a reference for the new height

I bought another set of legs to shorten so we still have the original ones for use in the kitchen.

~ by Allan Ford

The post IKEA Low chair: Using the Antilop in the lounge appeared first on IKEA Hackers.

Are you in year-end reflection mode? How was 2017 for you?

For me, it was a good, good year. Good, not in a unicorn-and-rainbows kind of way but an expanding, gut-wrenching type of good. Challenging on many levels, but still good.

I’ll be taking Christmas off and will be back on Tuesdays with new hacks. But before I sign off, let me share my 3 highlights from 2017.

#1 I put a book out, with the help of this group of incredible hackers. The process was not all smooth and there were times I wanted to quit. But in retrospect, I’m happy I steeled my belly and pushed through. Through the ups and downs, I learnt to work those determination muscles a fair bit. I developed new stamina for working on a single long-haul project consistently. I’ve always been a project sprinter, but now I know, I can do marathons, figuratively. If you’re interested, you can get the book here.

#2 I launched a new site design for IKEAhackers. The site redesign hit a few road bumps. I wanted to move IKEAhackers to a different hosting company (for cost savings) but the customer support I encountered with these 2 other companies were either non-existent or paltry. Before I signed...

Now here’s an idea for the holiday season – an X’mas ball, literally.

Replace the paper flowers on the IKEA MASKROS lamp with Christmas ornaments. Voilà! Instant festive vibe!

~ by Peter Stroo

The post X’mas ball appeared first on IKEA Hackers.

One problem with the Brimnes three door wardrobe is the lack of drawers. The unit comes with only three widely separated shelves in the right storage area. The Alex 9 drawer unit fits – after some cuts. Both the Brimnes wardrobe and Alex 9-drawer are $129. There is a shorter Alex unit, but it is 27 1/2″ deep.

Photos: IKEA.com

The Brimnes storage area below the fixed shelf is 14 7/8″ wide, 18 3/4″ deep and 36 3/4″ high (29″ high between the door hardware). Alex is 14 1/8″ wide, 19″ deep and 45 5/8″ high. It is only available in white.

Photo: IKEA.com

Alex can be reduced in size to fit the entire area (unit will be off-center to ensure adequate space for the door hardware on the right) or centered (unit will sit between the door hardware). I centered the Alex unit.

Centered, the final unit will have four large drawers and one one small drawer. Full height will have four large and three small drawers.

I made a narrow rolling kitchen cart to fit along my refrigerator, made from IKEA BEKVÄM spice racks.

I had no other choice but build it since the space was only 11cm wide, and nothing manufactured matched these dimensions.

Materials: (total 60€)

  • 4 x BEKVÄM spice racks (16€)
  • 4 x copper tube (1m long / 12mm wide inside – 14mm outside) (26€)
  • 4 x omni-directional casters (~10€)
  • Wood varnish (~6€)
  • Wood paste (~8€)
  • 16 x less than 15mm wood screws (a board is 15mm thick) (~3€)
Photo: IKEA.com

Tools:

  • Screwdriver or screw-gun
  • Drill (the screw-gun in drill mode do the job just fine)
  • 14mm drill bit
  • Sand paper / sander machine
  • Glue gun
Steps to build a rolling kitchen cart

1. Do not assemble the BEKVÄM spice rack. Fill up the holes on the sides of the BEKVÄM with wood paste, as we won’t be needing them. I used a big syringe to do it as the holes were small.

2. Drill new holes for the copper tubes. I used a paper template to mark the holes center with precision on the four boards.

Ikea items used : 106 cm high Ikea Bookshelf (302.638.44)

I have 2 Billy bookshelves. I would like to shorten them, because they are too high. They are initially 106 cm high (41 3/4 “), which is 21 cm (8″) higher than my Ektorp couch. I would like to bring them down to 85 cm (33 1/2”).

Photo: IKEA.com

I am thinking of just sawing the side panels at the top, and drawing new holes for the wooden plugs, as well as the iron “screws”.

An Ikea representative told me that if I touch anything on the item, it won’t be stable anymore, because things are optimized for the specified layout, not for any change.

Thus I wanted to know whether anyone has experience trying this, or if anyone knows whether drawing holes at this point of the panels will be efficient, or whether the panels are hollow at this place.

Any general feedback is welcome.

~ by Victor

***

Hi Victor

Shortening BILLY bookcases has definitely been done before.

Take a look at this. See the shorter BILLY next to the “unhacked” one? Exactly what you want, right?

This hacker reduced the top section of the BILLY side panel. And later added a new top to cover the raw...