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2018-04-23T21:20:43.256Z
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Picnic season is finally upon us and we have been kicking it off with two new favorite things. The first one is a bike and the other is a bread.

We have been dreaming of a Danish cargo bike for years and years, and last month we finally splurged on this one. It’s the perfect vehicle for us because we can fit all three kids in it with seatbelts and all. It’s ideal to bring home heavy grocery bags with. And it’s environmentally friendly. All practicalities aside, it is also so much fun to ride around with and we are roaming from playground to picnic spots without a hitch. Just packing a few blankets, a big smoothie, a rhubarb compote and this beauty of a bread.

We created this recipe for all type of picnic situations. We wanted something spring-y and savory that tasted awesome and could manage a bumpy bike ride. It’s basically like a savory muffin that we bake in a sheet pan. It serves many, is easy to make, super moist and flavorful and you can make lots of variations on it (although I love the look of thinly shaved asparagus on top).

Needless to say, this is also ideal for a brunch or or other weekend gatherings.

Just like a foccacia, the bread acts as...

I feel extra enthusiastic about this post partly because I think we are on to something good here. But also because this headline speaks so much to my magazine-publishing-heart (my previous career). This is a dinner concept that we have played around with lately and it works particularly well for families with sensitive eaters or allergies. The idea is built around cooking one recipe base and then making some last minute add-ins to suit various preferences. Or to turn the leftovers of one dish into a new one the next day. The base can be anything from a salad, a basic stew, a cooked grain, a good sauce or, as here, a soup. In this recipe we are taking a simple tomato broth soup in three different directions. The kids love this with tortellini (or any other pasta) dropped into it. They actually prefer it to tomato sauce. Luise and I like to let a chunk of mozzarella (or burrata cheese) melt in the soup and serve it with some leftover cooked quinoa to make it more filling. Another favorite of ours is to stir chopped kale, chickpeas and a little chili paste into the broth and topping it with avocado for a chunkier vegan version. The way it usually works is that we cook one big batch of broth and then pour the kids version in a smaller sauce pan, drop in the ravioli and let it cook for another minute or two until soft. While we stir in or other add-ins to our version. It’s...

Hi, David here. I’ll get to the recipe soon but first I just wanted to share a little scene from last night. Isac was watching a baking program for kids and as I was tucking him in, he thoroughly explained the whole process of making croissants to me. ”You have so much butter in croissants, dad. Like, a lot. You put it on the dough and fold it over the butter like this. And you hit it with the rolling pin like this, bam bam bam”. When it comes to numbers and letters, he can be a little clueless, but the fact that our three year-old had memorized all the details in croissant baking from just watching it once on tv, made me all happy and proud. I’m not saying that mastering a croissant is more important than math, but teaching our kids how to cook has been one of the things I’ve really looked forward to as a dad. And he is really into it. The little kids stove has long been his favorite toy both at home and in kindergarten an he often serves imaginary pancakes to all his friends. I’ve promised him that we will make croissants together tonight so I’m off to prep a dough right after this (making the rye croissants from Green Kitchen Travels). I’ll report back with how it goes.

Today’s recipe doesn’t have anything to do with croissants but Isac does play a little part as kitchen helper in the video below.

Before we dig into this showpiece of a sweet bowl, I wanted to share a little feature that I started on my instagram this month. I simply call it March Favorites. It’s a curated list of seasonal favorites that I will share each month. Things that I wear or use and ingredients that we cook with. And since it’s a new thing, I included it here as well. As a sort of inspiration.
/Luise

M A R C H   F A V O R I T E S

Golden milk & raw honey. To warm me up in this cold weather. Here is a recipe.
Ginger root. We grate ginger over everything at the moment to keep our immune system strong and because almost all food and drinks just taste better with lots of ginger.
Beet & red cabbage kraut. This little bubbly friend is soon ready! Fermented food is your superfood number one! The recipe is from our book Green Kitchen at Home but another one is here.
Socks. Stockholm has been too cold this month so I’m walking around in these super soft Alpaca wool socks that David’s friend in London makes.
Kale flower sprouts. A pretty looking mashup of two of my favorite ingredients – kale och brussels...

After having spent 30 minutes listening to my soon eight-year-old daughter telling a joke, I can tell you with 100% certainty that she’s got a talent for comedy. Someone apparently told her this joke in school and she tried explaining it to me repeatedly without ever reaching the pun. It was the funniest thing I’ve heard in years. Especially because she refused to give up and just kept at it. Something about blood dripping in a dark room and an old woman peeling tomatoes (although I think it should be blood orange, but don’t tell her). While I was literally ROFL with her for failing and yet succeeding with her comedy act, I had this revelation that this is it. This is the meaning of it all. As good as it gets. Total presens. Laughing so my tummy hurts together with someone I love unlimitedly.

So here is a suggestion. Whip up a couple of good spreads and dips, fill a tray with veggies, shut off your phone and sit down with someone you love and tell each other jokes tonight – good and bad ones.

These spreads don’t call for neither tomatoes nor blood oranges, but if you make the one with beetroot, your hands will look blood stained nevertheless [Yes! I knew there was a lame pun somewhere in there]. The pink one is a Beet, Bean & Sumac Spread that we like a lot (especially Luise, who adds a couple of dollops on top of scramble eggs for breakfast). It has a beautiful color and an intricate and...

Two things spinned in my head when I woke up Wednesday morning. Both were related to pizza. I had fallen asleep while watching the first episode of David Chang’s new Netflix series Ugly Delicious. Pizza and authenticity was the theme but the first thought in my head was actually pie. Chang visits a pizza chef in Brooklyn that makes a case for traditional American-Italian toppings but what fascinated me more than his arguments was that he always referred to his pizzas as ”pies”. Apparently they sometimes do that in the US. Why did I not know that? I’m gonna say pie from now on. With a Brooklyn accent. ”Jeetyet? Nah, I’m mad hungry! Try this here Kale Pie.”

My second thought was that I really craved pizza (or, ehm, pie)! The real stuff. Wheat + rye, yeast, salt, water and olive oil. With tomato sauce and lots of cheese. A cheese pie, I guess that Brooklyn chef would call it.

So not too long after breakfast, I whipped up the dough, cooked a tomato sauce and bought lots of mozzarella cheese. While the dough was proofing, I decided to also make a cauliflower pizza base. It’s pretty quick to make, Luise prefers it to the traditional base and I thought ”Better having too much pie than too little” (all my thoughts literally had a Brooklyn accent by this point). We were out of both cauliflower and almond flour so I tried it with broccoli and rolled oats instead. It worked...

We usually don’t do a big thing of Valentine’s day so I’m not sure what happened here. Maybe it was because we recently got married or because Elsa has been drawing and folding Valentine gifts (for us!) for the past week. Perhaps it was because Noah slowly has been starting his kindergarten training so we are finally getting a few moments together again without any kids around. Or was it perhaps simply because we have always secretly been dreaming of creating a big American-style ice cream shake topped with whipped cream, meringues, chocolate and the full shebang. Yup, that was probably it.

Luise mentioned the idea of a shake this morning and a few hours later we found ourselves in our living room window, looking at these two shakes overloaded with toppings (and with a million small pieces of nuts, crushed meringues and chocolate spread across on the floor). As naughty as they look, these shakes are made with real ingredients. They even has beetroot in them. And they are entirely vegan.

The base is a deliciously thick nice cream made with frozen bananas, frozen raspberries, dates, nut milk ice cubes and beetroot. Because we wanted it thick, you need a strong blender or food processor to get it smooth. But you can also just replace some of the frozen ingredients with thawed to make it more like a smoothie and easier to blend. We top it with vegan meringues (which we happened to have at home), whipped coconut cream,...

We hardly need to mention that we love pancakes in our family, do we? A quick look through our insta feeds and cookbooks and you’ll find a wide variety of them. There are small and thick banana pancakes served in bowls for luxurious weekend breakfasts, baked fat almond pancake for a light summer dinner, an impressive pancake layer cake for birthday celebrations and of course the regular thin pancakes aka crêpes that we make almost weekly for dinner. We put lots of savory (or sweet) toppings/fillings on our dinner pancakes and then either fold them or roll them up. And we save the leftovers in a lunch box or have as breakfast the morning after.

Most of our pancake recipes include eggs but today we are sharing one of our favorite vegan (and gluten free) versions. It’s a thin and soft take on socca. You only need two ingredients to make this: chickpea flour (besan) and water, but we like add salt and herbs for more flavor and a nice green color. We made these pancakes for lunch and topped them with mashed avocado, pesto, red cabbage sauerkraut (check out the recipe in Green Kitchen at Home), lettuce and tomato. It was what we had in the fridge and it turned out to be a good and simple combo (no extra cooking needed). But don’t feel obliged to follow us, you can top it with...

It’s a new year and instead of all the usual resolutions, cleanses and promises we have simply decided that 2018 is going to be the year that we slay weekend meal prepping. We are talking Sunday evening batch cooking, roasting, peeling and jaring – grandma style – here. We have previously been half-doing this with a more random batch cooking approach (which you can read more about in the first chapter of Green Kitchen at Home). But we’re stepping things up now. Life with three kids is stressful as it is and this method helps us to eat well during the week, save time and be more spontanious. It also helps us avoiding those hangry (hungry/angry) kid-situations. We have only been doing this properly for the past months now but thought we’d start sharing the basics right away, in case you guys want to start doing this along with us.

The Method
Food prepping is a simple method and surely many of you already know the basics. The idea is that it is a lot easier to cook and eat real food during the week if you prepare and cook some of the ingredients on the weekend before. Less prepping during the week also means fewer bowls, boards and knives to clean up. So we focus on things that can stay fresh in the fridge during the week and can be used in a number of different meals. Some things are cooked or roasted and other are simply peeled, rinsed or chopped. And we also make...

Well this feels a bit weird. Writing about winter food in the middle of the night from a cute little house with a tiny swimmingpool in warm and humid Bali, Indonesia. We decided to skip Christmas this year and instead bring the kids on a sort of honeymoon holiday, so we left Stockholm last week and will stay here in Bali for a couple of more weeks. We’re mostly airbnb-ing around the island and have already experienced lots of beautiful places, monsoon down pours mixed with sunshine, excellent tempeh (and crunchy sweet tempeh), creepy insects and countless fruit platters and smoothie bowls. Traveling with three kids is definitely trickier than just one or two but we’re learning and adapting. And at the end of each day it still feels so rewarding seeing the world with them and talking about all the funny and weird travel related subjects that pop-up in their heads. Several years ago we wrote a blog post (and a chapter in our travel book) about traveling with kids and we’re thinking about writing an updated version with more guidelines and tips that we’ve picked up as our crew has grown. Let us know if you’d be interested in that.

But enough about that now. The goal of the day was simply to share this little salad before Christmas is over. I realize that it’s a little late and many of you have already planned your holiday menu. But if you happen to be searching for a side dish that also could work as...

The moment I placed these brownies in the oven, I started whining like a disgruntled teenager because Luise had persuaded me to only sweeten them with dates and mix a whole can of black beans into the batter. “They are going to taste like sh*t” might have been the carefully formulated phrase I used. Baking brownies was my idea to start with and I usually don’t complain about healthy desserts, but I was tired that day and my mind was set on the caramel-tasting brownies from the bakery across the street. More than the flavor, it was their texture I wanted to recreate. The crusty top and caramel fudge center that you only can achieve with sugar, butter and flour. I knew these would be far from that. And in my mind that was all Luise’s fault.

The whining escalated into a discussion (aka argument) and by the time the timer on my phone rang, things were, well, kind of tense between us. I cut off a corner piece of the baked brownie and quickly realized that they weren’t as awful as I had expected. Of course when Luise asked me, I did what any 36-year old teenager would do and grunted: “They were okay I guess”. In reality, they were actually pretty good. They didn’t have that crusty texture or typical sugar taste but they were still sweet, gooey but not heavy, chocolatey, energy packed and rich. I added frosting to make them a little more sassy – using dates as sweetener and avocado and coconut oil for an ultra lush and...

Hey! First of all, thanks for all your cheering words on the news of our marriage. That was fun! Secondly, I’ve promised 778 people on instagram that we would share a chocolate recipe which currently goes by the working name Taco Brownies. But all the interest in them made me a little anxious so I’m heading back into the kitchen today to test another round before we’re ready to post them. Here is something to snack on while you wait. A peanut butter sandwich and a green smoothie.

Technically, a sandwich hardly qualifies as a recipe. But what we want to say with this point is really just that you should try peanut butter on a savory sandwich. I love all kind of nut butter sandwiches and even if I usually top them with sliced bananasapples, strawberries or a sweet compote, this savory version is my most recent addiction. Crispy lettuce and cucumber add a nice textural contrast to the sandwich without competing with the peanut butter flavor. The cottage cheese makes it moist and yummy and the chickpeas … well I don’t know why the chickpeas are there actually. I guess I just like chickpeas inside my sandwiches. This sandwich is yummy, sticky, crunchy, rich and yet fresh somehow. We usually make it with a good quality rye bread but anything goes.

I just realized that this is a...

Hey guess what, we just got married! In a beautiful greenhouse in Rosendal’s Garden in Stockholm, surrounded by our closest family and friends (+ ALL their kids) and accompanied by live jazz music and gorgeous food. Even though I proposed to Luise in the back of a campervan on New Zealand almost three years ago, we pulled this wedding together – from idea to ”I do” – in less than five weeks. With three young kids, constantly overflowing mailboxes and an unhealthy always-need-to-be-in-control tendency, we realized that if we don’t do a quick and spontaneous wedding, we probably won’t get hitched until we are retired. So instead of our dream wedding going on for three days and nights in the Italian country side, we aimed for an informal and cosy autumn gathering in one of our favorite Stockholm locations. It turned out so much better than we could ever have hoped for and we are now officially mr and mrs.

We let the chefs at Rosendal take care of all the food (which was a huge relief). Our only instructions for the lunch buffet (lunch is much easier if you want friends with kids to attend) was that we wanted hearty salads and food roughly in line with our own philosophy. Typically, we didn’t get any photos of the whole buffet table, but there were roasted vegetables, butter tossed potato and chanterelles, slaw with pickled mustard seeds, hummus, sourdough bread, sauerkraut, a goat’s cheese salad with shredded beets, herb sauces and lots and lots of cake. All seasonal and...

I know what you are thinking. Where is the cake and what is that red sauce? In most other countries this would be called a trifle or a parfait, but in Denmark we call this an old-fashioned apple cake (although our version is modernized). I have the fondest memories leaning over a huge bowl of Gammeldags æblekage at my grandmother’s kitchen table. It’s made of smooth apple sauce (our version is red) topped with crushed cookie crumbles and whipped cream and it was my favorite dessert in the world. Me and my twin brother spent every other weekend and school holiday at my grandmother’s house. She was the warmest and calmest person we knew, always smiling. My memories are fading but whenever I think of her I can smell the cigarillos she loved to smoke and the hair spray she always wore. And I remember her huge black & white marble coffee table that we often sat around and her warm hugs. She had a big house and rented out one room in the basement, one on the top floor and one in the garden to various tenants. On weekends she baked for everyone in the house. Large batches of spiced pound cake, chocolate cake or her famous (in my world) old-fashioned apple cake. I never thought of it back then but – damn! – she must have been the best landlord. When my twin brother and I were 10 years old she sadly passed away, two days after...

I tried to write this post late last night after all kids had been tucked to bed. I was sitting in our couch with my laptop on my knee and a bar of dark chocolate, a jar of salted almonds and a glass of water within reach. I was ready to do this. The next thing I remember is Isac’s hand pulling my hair three hours later. A dream had woken him up and he wanted me to come sleep next to him. I took a quick look at my computer and realized I had written zero words. So, new try today. This time I’m sitting at an outside cafe in broad daylight so I’ll hopefully not fall asleep here.

Today’s recipe is an autumnal approach on tortilla. You know that potato and egg cake that is sold on the counter of literally every corner shop, cafe and tapas bar in Spain. It’s a great snack and super popular with our kids whenever we are in Barcelona so we have started making it at home as well.

It’s easy to get lost in the Spanish tortilla vs Italian frittata discussion. When I previewed the first version of this recipe on Instagram, I already received some comments that “this isn’t a Spanish tortilla”. Well of course not. It’s a Swedish tortilla. Seriously though, I realize that we have bent this recipe quite far – adding...

We’ve got a small, square shaped wooden table with three chairs + a highchair in our kitchen. I bought the table when I moved to my first 1-bedroom apartment and it was perfect for that tiny space. Back then I only had two chairs and the table mostly carried pasta dishes and red wine glasses. Eighteen years, four apartments and three children later, we still eat most our meals on it. It is honestly not very pretty and its wine stains are now mixed with blueberries, turmeric, coconut and all the stains, smudges and scratches that come from years of feeding babies. Because it is square shaped and we are five in the family, Luise or I end up eating our meals either standing up or sitting on an extra stool squeezed in on a corner. It’s a small but pretty striking symbol that:

A) I am too sentimental about my furniture.

B) We weren’t entirely prepared for how life with three children would be.

I wrote a little text on Instagram about this. That behind glossy photos of food, travels and a kitchen that on good days looks picture perfect, we are still trying to figure out life. And find somewhere to sit. The plan is to get a round table that hopefully both will fit into the kitchen and have seats for the entire family. But until then, I’ll keep eating standing up.

Now that we are back doing more frequent recipe posts again, we also wanted to throw some super simple, everyday type dinners into the mix. Family style!

The hands-down easiest dish that I (David) know (and make when I’m alone with the kids and have max 10 minutes to prepare dinner) is to cook a package of fresh gnocchi, mix a store-bought pesto with mashed avocado, add a little extra lemon and olive oil and just stir everything together with some canned chickpeas and cherry tomatoes on top. It’s a lazy dinner but the kids devour it, it’s super easy and most importantly QUICK. Today’s recipe is a riff on that.

We are fully aware that you hardly need yet another recipe for spaghetti al pesto. But we have got a few twists that turn this simple Italian classic into a rather nutrition packed meal. And a really tasty one as well. Although our version is so far from the original that we probably never will be allowed back into our beloved Italy again …

  1. Try chickpea (or lentil) pasta. These new-style pastas made on chickpea or lentil flour taste good, have surprisingly pleasant texture and are more protein packed than regular pasta. If you want to use ordinary pasta, we’d recommend adding some cooked chickpeas to the dish as well. They taste great tossed with pesto.
  2. Add avocado to your pesto. It will be much creamier, fluffier, richer and rounder....

Just checking in quickly today to share a nice little apple breakfast recipe that we have been making a lot lately. We know that August hasn’t ended yet and we all want to hold on to summer for as long as we can and pretend that winter isn’t coming. But we thought we’d provide you with a little something for when the first chillier days arrive (which has already happened here btw) and you hear raindrops come knocking on your window sills. For those moments, you can just bust these baked apples out of the oven, let the scent of warm cinnamon spread through your home and immediately feel a little better about the whole situation.

We have been making variations of this both as breakfast and dessert – filling them with oatmeal topped with yogurt for breakfast, and a date and almond paste topped with whipped cream for dessert.

The idea to pimp regular oatmeal/porridge by stuffing it inside baked apples is pretty great in its simplicity. But here we make it a tad more special and extra delicious by cooking the oatmeal with pure apple juice/cider, spices, butter or coconut oil and chopped almonds for extra rich flavor and texture. We then top the baked apples with a thick yogurt and drizzle with ginger honey for sweetness. And if you’ve got a little nut butter...

Earlier this year we were in New York to launch Green Kitchen at Home. We had a blast doing a live cooking session at Food52, teaching a cooking class and had a book signing in a tiny but packed little store in Greenwich Village. But what I really wanted to talk about today was our night off. When we tucked baby Noah (formerly known as Gabriel) to sleep in his stroller and headed to ABCV for dinner. Side note: You should know that for being a food writing couple, Luise and I very rarely go out and eat at proper restaurants. With kids, it’s just easier to do takeaway or pick places where it’s okay that they climb, run and crash. Also, fancy restaurants make me feel awkward. But we had an epic evening at ABCV. We tried the tasting menu of which I can’t even remember half of the dishes. But I know that there were simple crudités with lots of spreads, some kind of soft beet carpaccio/tartare with a little bit of sting to it, a whole roasted cauliflower with turmeric tahini dressing(!), avocado lettuce cups, roasted shiitake and a couple of desserts. And what made the evening even better was that Noah slept through almost the entire dinner (thank you jetlag!).

We have been talking about that beet carpaccio (and the cauliflower with tahini turmeric dressing) a few...

Hello! This is David & Luise. Remember us? During our almost eight years of blogging we have never left it silent for two months before. We’re going to do what we always do in these situations and blame the kids. Wether we miss a dentist appointment, forget to answer a text message, get a parking ticket or are two months late with a blog post, it’s always our kid’s fault. In this case however it’s actually somewhat true. We simply underestimated how much time and attention three kids on summer holiday takes. They have sooo much energy. I (David) have been thinking of ways to connect them (and with them I mean Isac) to the power grid so that they (he) could replace a nuclear power plant or two. And I could perhaps cash in a Nobel price for saving the world. Anyway, after a couple of weeks of feeling bad about not having a single second over to blog new recipes, we instead decided to give ourselves a summer break from it all. So we have been trying to keep up with our children’s pace (obviously impossible) and play on their rules (also impossible because they ignore rules) this summer. It’s been fun and much needed.

But we are here now with plenty of new recipe ideas and projects. Lots of other things have happened during the summer. We almost bought ourselves a tiny smoothie bar in a park, we burnt pancakes from Green Kitchen at Home inside a jam-packed...