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2018-01-16T14:55:16.649Z
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{"feed":"Dogs-News-ScienceDaily","feedTitle":"Dogs News -- ScienceDaily","feedLink":"/feed/Dogs-News-ScienceDaily","catTitle":"Animals","catLink":"/cat/animals"}
Experts are warning dog and cat owners to be aware of the risks associated with feeding their pets raw meat-based diets, instead of the more conventional dry or canned pet foods.
Most commercially available dog treats contain a range of undefined ingredients, including sugars, and often exceed the recommended daily energy allowance for treats ('complementary feed'), warn researchers.
Researchers are warning of a 'significant peak' in the risk of chocolate poisoning in dogs over the Christmas period as households stock up on festive treats. In a new, researchers have used electronic health records from UK veterinary practices to analyze cases of chocolate ingestion in dogs.
Grey wolves, as all wild animals, are hosts to a variety of parasites. The presence of grey wolves in German forests has little influence on the parasite burden of hunting dogs, according to a new study.
New research has found that dogs lick their mouths as a response to looking at angry human faces, suggesting that domestic canines may have a functional understanding of emotional information.
The first study to actually count the number of cortical neurons in the brains of a number of carnivores, including cats and dogs, has found that dogs possess significantly more of them than cats.
Researchers are creating a library of movement data from different dog breeds, to make animal animations in films and video games more realistic.
The first comparison of plain water, electrolyte injections and a chicken-flavored electrolyte drink as techniques for keeping sniffer dogs hydrated when working in hot weather finds that while all are safe and effective, dogs drink more and are more hydrated when given a chicken-flavored electrolyte drink.
Researchers have for the first time determined the full genetic consequences of intense inbreeding in a threatened species.
Researchers found that oxytocin made dogs interested in smiling human faces. It also made them see angry faces as less threatening. Associated with affection and trust, the hormone oxytocin is probably a key factor in the interaction between dogs and humans.
A team of scientists have used national registries of more than 3.4 million Swedes aged 40 to 80 to study the association between dog ownership and cardiovascular health. Their study shows that dog owners had a lower risk of death due to cardiovascular disease or to other causes during the 12-year follow-up.
New research now shows that removing splashes of colors, shadows or water puddles from corrals, keeping noise levels down and not using dogs and electric prods can dramatically reduce the stress cattle experience.
The Mediterranean black truffle, one of the world's most expensive ingredients, has been successfully cultivated in the UK, as climate change threatens its native habitat.
Many dogs suffer anxiety and fear from the loud bangs and explosions of firework displays. A new study shows how a medicinal treatment can help alleviate common fear behaviors, such as trembling and whining.
A major study of dingo DNA has revealed dingoes most likely migrated to Australia in two separate waves via a former land bridge with Papua New Guinea. The find has significant implications for conservation, with researchers recommending the two genetically distinct populations of dingoes be treated as different groups for management and conservation purposes.
Injuries from wild animals are relatively uncommon, with a risk of unusual infections and other potentially severe complications.
Two new studies show there may be even more reason to love your dog as they may provide a protective effect against eczema and asthma.
Dogs produce more facial expressions when humans are looking at them, according to new research.
Following domestication, dogs should be more tolerant and cooperative with conspecifics and humans compared to wolves. But looking at both in more naturalistic living conditions, however, speaks for more cooperative behavior of wolves. Researchers now show that the wild ancestors are excelling their domesticated relatives in teamwork. In an experimental approach dogs but not wolves failed to cooperatively pull the two ends of a rope to obtain a piece of food.
Since the early 1900s, veterinarians have observed intervertebral disc disease -- a common cause of back pain, rear limb paralysis and inability to walk -- more frequently in dogs with short legs (dachshund, French bulldog, and Pekingese to name a few.) But they couldn't pinpoint why -- until now.Why short-legged dogs more likely to develop painful disease